celebrating web-active poets

Poets

A-D

Kelli Russell Agodon
Ivy Alvarez
Lucy Anderton
Miggy Angel
Amanda Auchter
Paul Scot August
Wendy Babiak
Gabeba Baderoon
Margaret Bashaar
Lisa Marie Basile
Sandra Beasley
Ilse Bendorf
Kate Bernadette Benedict
Kristin Berkey-Abbott
Nicolette Bethel
Ana Bozicevic
Reginald Dwayne Betts
Mary Biddinger
Rumjhum Biswas
Ann Bogle
Bruce Bond
Dave Bonta
Traci Brimhall
Nick Bruno
Rachel Bunting
Eric Burke
Sarah Busse
Jessie Carty
Grace Cavalieri
James Cervantes
Peter Ciccariello
Antonia Clark
Juliet Cook
David Cooke
Joanna Penn Cooper
Dawn Corrigan
Chella Courington
Cynthia Cox
Jamison Crabtree
Chris Crittenden
Rachel Dacus
Laura E. Davis
Kwame Dawes
Oliver De la Paz
Nick Demske
Nicole Cartwright Denison
J.P. Dancing Bear
Nancy Devine

E-L

Carolina Ebeid
Theresa Senato Edwards
Susan Elbe
Neil Ellman
Jill Alexander Essbaum
Justin Evans
Patricia Fargnoli
Ruth Foley
Adam Ford
Michaela Gabriel
John Gallaher
Bernadette Geyer
Howard Good
Brent Goodman
Rebecca Goss
Uma Gowrishankar
Lea Graham
Alex Grant
Kimberly Grey
Carol Guess
Carolyn Guinzio
Justin Hamm
Shannon Elizabeth Hardwick
Ron Hardy
Joseph Harker
Pamela Hart
Joshua Harmon
Crystal J. Hoffman
M.E. Hope
Amorak Huey
Rose Hunter
Jennifer Jean
Charles Jensen
Dick Jones
Patricia Wallace Jones
Kirstin Kaschock
Collin Kelley
Karen Kelsay
Adele Kenny
Lissa Kiernan
Tess Kincaid
Amy King
Kathleen Kirk
Christine Klocek-Lim
Christine Boyka Kluge
Jee Leong Koh
Namita Krishnamurthy
W.F. Lantry
Kristin LaTour
Ann Neuser Lederer
C.A. Leibow
Mari L’Esperance
Frannie Lindsay
Sarah Lindsay
Reb Livingston
Nicholas Liu
Diane Lockward
Patricia Lockwood
Sandy Longhorn
Helen Losse
Bridget Lowe
Rebecca Loudon

M-R

Aditi Machado
Amy MacLennan
Anthony Madrid
Marie-Elizabeth Mali
Clare Martin
Dana Guthrie Martin
Frances Ruhlen McConnel
Michelle McGrane
Melissa McEwen
Matt Merritt
Didi Menendez
Michelle Menting
Mary Meriam
Corey Mesler
Clayton T. Michaels
James Midgley
Amy Miller
Jim Murdoch
Muhammad Muwakil
Ben Nardolilli
Bruce Niedt
Carol Novack
Graham Nunn
David Oestreich
Sherry O’Keefe
Christina Olson
January Gill O’Neil
C. J. Opperthauser
Gabriel Orgrease
Hans Ostrom
Danielle Pafunda
Janice Pariat
Pamela Johnson Parker
Peter Pereira
Allan Peterson
Jessica Piazza
Andrew Philip
Karsten Piper
Cati Porter
Evelyn Posamentier
Andrea Potos
Dawn Potter
Nate Pritts
Philip Quinlan
Divya Rajan
Sam Rasnake
Monica Raymond
Susan Rich
Karen Rigby
Joshua Robbins
James Robison
David Rosenthal

S-Z

Jenny Sadre-Orafai
Brynn Saito
Scherezade Sanchita
Michael Schmeltzer
Steven D. Schroeder
Karen Schubert
Peter Schwartz
Eric Scovel
Greg Sellers
Daniel M. Shapiro
Laura Sheahen
Andrew Shields
Scot Siegel
Brian Simoneau
Susan Slaviero
Sarah J. Sloat
Erin Elizabeth Smith
Cheryl Snell
Felino Soriano
Marcus Speh
Sheila Squillante
Peter Stephens
Hannah Stephenson
Paul Stevens
David Allen Sullivan
John Swain
Jennifer K. Sweeney
Eileen Tabios
Rob Talbert
Ken Taylor
Jeet Thayil
Caitlin Elizabeth Thomson
Matthew Thorburn
David Tomaloff
Emma Trelles
Troy Urquhart
Wendy Vardaman
Helen Vitoria
Donna Vorreyer
J. Michael Wahlgren
Terresa Wellborn
Michael Wells
Gabriel Welsch
Johnathon Williams
Susan Settlemyre Willliams
Sarah Westcott
Robert E. Wood
Nicholas Wong
Bill Yarrow
Debbie Yee
Susan Yount
Andrew Zawacki
J. Zimmerman
Desmond Kon Zhicheng-Mingdé

A-D

Kelli Russell Agodon
On Whale Sound: Sometimes I Still Dream of Their Pink Bodies (originally published in Poetry South East).
Kelli Russell Agodon is the author of Letters from the Emily Dickinson Room, published by White Pine Press, winner of the White Pine Press Poetry Prize judged by Carl Dennis. She is also the author of Small Knots and Geography, winner of the 2003 Floating Bridge Press Chapbook Award. She is the editor of the Seattle’s 28 year old literary journal, Crab Creek Review. Back to top.


Ivy Alvarez
On Whale Sound: bend (from Ivy’s collection Mortal – Red Morning Press, 2006).
Ivy Alvarez is the author of Mortal (Washington, DC: Red Morning Press, 2006). A recipient of writing residencies from MacDowell Colony (USA), Hawthornden Castle (UK) and Fundacion Valparaiso (Spain), her poetry is published in journals and anthologies in many countries and online. Back to top.


Lucy Anderton
On Whale Sound: Oh Memory. How I Choose You (originally published at Drunken Boat)
Lucy Anderton is rebuilding a 500-year-old brothel in the south of France. Her work has appeared in Drunken Boat, Crazyhorse, Verse Daily, The Iowa Review, Barrow Street, Forklift, Ohio, and From the Fishouse Anthology, among others, and is forthcoming in FENCE. She is tired of dust in her life and feels the chamber pot is an under-appreciated piece of furniture. Back to top.


Miggy Angel
On Whale Sound: The Message (originally published in 3AM Magazine)
Miggy Angel was born in London, & is now resident of Nottingham. He has poems published in 3am Magazine. After years of writing in deep monastic concentration this Angel is ready to spread his wings. He blogs at We Bleed Ink. Back to top.


Amanda Auchter
On Whale Sound: Alcedama.
Amanda is the founding editor of Pebble Lake Review and the author of The Glass Crib, winner of the 2010 Zone 3 Press First Book Award judged by Rigoberto González and of the chapbook, Light Under Skin (Finishing Line Press, 2006). A former Theodore Morrison Poetry Scholar for the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, she has received awards and honors from Bellevue Literary Review, BOMB Magazine, Crab Orchard Review, and others. Her writing appears in American Poetry Review, Court Green, Indiana Review, The Iowa Review, Poetry Daily, and elsewhere. She holds an MFA from Bennington College and teaches creative writing and literature at Lone Star College-CyFair. Back to top.

Paul Scot August
On Whale Sound: Railroad Bridge, Rice Lake, Wisconsin (originally published in Passages North).
Paul Scot August was born on the North side of Chicago and moved to Wisconsin in 1986. He has an MA in Creative Writing from UW-Milwaukee. He has worked as an upholstery salesman, a roofer, a dishwasher, a mail room sorter, an automobile mechanic, a daycare worker, a pizza delivery driver, an independent bookstore owner, and a software developer. He is a former poetry editor of The Cream City Review. His poetry has appeared or is upcoming in The Los Angeles Review, Stone’s THrow Magazine, Dunes Review, Naugatuck River Review, Passages North , Poetry Quarterly, The Cream City Review, Scribble Magazine and elsewhere. He currently lives in the Milwaukee area with his two children. Back to top.

Wendy Babiak
On Whale Sound: Ekphrasis on a Screensaver (originally published at Big Bridge)
Wendy Babiak (Conspiracy of Leaves, Plain View Press) wonders what the world would be like if we realized we were not only kin with each other, but with the rest of the natural world. Her poems have appeared in a variety of venues, including Tampa Review, Poets for Living Waters, Big Bridge, Poems Against War, No Tell Motel, and (the fabulous) -esque. Back to top.

Gabeba Baderoon
On Whale Sound: How To Find Something Lost
Gabeba Baderoon is a South African poet, and the author of the collections The Dream in the Next Body (2005), The Museum of Ordinary Life (2005) and A Hundred Silences (2006). Baderoon’s poetry has been widely translated and has appeared in journals and anthologies in South Africa, Europe and the US. She received the DaimlerChrysler Award for South African Poetry and the Guest Writer Fellowship at the Nordic Africa Institute in 2005. In 2008, she was a fellow at the Civitella Ranieri Foundation and was the inaugural Humanities Writer in Residence at the University of Witwatersrand. Back to top.

Margaret Bashaar
On Whale Sound: Things of the Earth
Margaret Bashaar’s first chapbook, Barefoot and Listening, was published by Tilt Press in late 2009. Her poetry has also appeared in journals such as Caketrain, Arsenic Lobster, GUD, and Pear Noir!, as well as the anthology Time You Let Me In: 25 Poets Under 25. She presently lives in Pittsburgh, PA where she serves as developmental director for The TypewriterGirls, Pittsburgh’s only poetry cabaret, and still writes poetry about her childhood crush, Captain Picard. Back to top.

Lisa Marie Basile
On Whale Sound: Memories of Church Street (originally published at Melusine).
Lisa Marie Basile is a writer from New York. She is the founding editor of Caper Literary Journal and has been published in several literary journals, including Moon Milk Review, The View from Here, Word Riot, elimae and others. She will have her full-length poetry book released by Cervena Barva Press in 2012. Her chapbook, White Spiders, was released by Gold Wake Press.

She currently works with PEN American Center’s Prison Writing Program and is an M.F.A. candidate at The New School, where she is on the staff for LIT. She’s earned 1st place in both poetry and fiction from Pace University’s annual writing contest. Back to top.

Sandra Beasley
On Whale Sound: The Piano Speaks.
Sandra won the 2009 Barnard Women Poets Prize for I Was the Jukebox, selected by Joy Harjo (W.W. Norton, 2010). Her first collection, Theories of Falling, won the 2007 New Issues Poetry Prize judged by Marie Howe. Her poetry has appeared in Poetry, Slate, and The Believer, and was chosen for The Best American Poetry 2010.

Other honors include the 2010 University of Mississippi Summer Poet in Residence position, a DCCAH Individual Artist Fellowship, the Friends of Literature Prize from the Poetry Foundation, and the Maureen Egen Exchange Award from Poets & Writers. She has received fellowships to the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, the Millay Colony, VCCA, and Vermont Studio Center.

Sandra lives in Washington, D.C., where she serves on the Board of the Writer’s Center. Her nonfiction has been featured in the Washington Post Magazine and she is working on Don’t Kill the Birthday Girl: Tales From an Allergic Life, forthcoming from Crown. She blogs at Chicks Dig Poetry. Back to top.

Ilse Bendorf
On Whale Sound: Catch A Body (originally published at Blood Orange Review.)
A graduate of the University of Iowa, Ilse Bendorf was a 2010 Lambda Literary Fellow for Emerging LGBT Writers, and in 2008 attended the Irish Writing Program in Dublin. Ilse’s poems have been published in Blood Orange Review, 5×5, and The Daily Palette/Iowa Writes, an online project curated by the staff of The Iowa Review. Currently, Ilse is applying to MFA programs in poetry, and blogs here. / Back to top.

Kate Bernadette Benedict
On Whale Sound: In the Key of Snow
Kate Bernadette Benedict, of New York City, is the author of two full-length poetry collections, Here from Away (2003) and In Company, publishing in late 2011. She edits three online poetry journals, Umbrella, Bumbershoot and Tilt-a-Whirl. Visit her home page. Back to top.

Kristin Berkey-Abbott
On Whale Sound: Honeybees on Holiday (originally published in MiPoesias)
Kristin Berkey-Abbott earned a Ph.D. in British Literature from the University of South Carolina. She has published in many journals and was one of the top ten finalists in the National Looking Glass Poetry Chapbook Competition. Pudding House Publications published her chapbook, Whistling Past the Graveyard, in 2004. Finishing Line Press has just accepted her second chapbook, I Stand Here Shredding Documents, for upcoming publication. Currently, she teaches English and Creative Writing at the Art Institute of Ft. Lauderdale and serves as Chair of the General Education department. Back to top.

Nicolette Bethel
On Whale Sound: The Carpenter Seals Lily’s Widowhood (1943) (originally published at Anti-); and Easter Monday: The North Side (originally published in Town).
Nicolette Bethel is a Bahamian playwright, poet, anthropologist and blogger and the founding editor of tongues of the ocean. Her work has been published in a variety of print and online publications.
Back to top.


Reginald Dwayne Betts
On Whale Sound: A Head Full of Feathers (Appears in Shahid Reads His Own Palm published by Alice James Books.)
Reginald Dwayne Betts has been awarded the Holden Fellowship from the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers, the Soros Justice Fellowship from the Open Society Institute, a Cave Canem Fellowship, and a scholarship to the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. His poetry has appeared in such journals as Ploughshares, Crab Orchard Review and Poet Lore. Betts graduated from Prince George’s Community College in Largo, Maryland and the University of Maryland in College Park. His memoir, A Question of Freedom, was published by Avery/Penguin in 2009. Back to top.


Mary Biddinger
On Whale Sound: Miniatures. (First published at Slant.)
Mary Biddinger is the author of Prairie Fever (Steel Toe Books, 2007) and the chapbook Saint Monica (forthcoming, Black Lawrence Press). She edits the Akron Series in Poetry, and co-edits Barn Owl Review and the Akron Series in Contemporary Poetics. She teaches at the University of Akron and directs the NEOMFA. Back to top.

Rumjhum Biswas
On Whale Sound: The Other Side of the Sun (originally published in Mascara Review.
Rumjhum Biswas’ prose and poetry have been published in India and abroad, both in print and online. Notably in Per Contra, Sybil’s Garage, Markings, Off The Coast, Kritya (India), Bare Root Review, South (UK), Words-Myth (UK), Pratilipi, Eclectica, Nth Position (UK), The King’s English, Poems Niederngasse (Switzerland), Dirtcakes, Crannog (Ireland) The Little Magazine (India) and Going Down Swinging and Etchings (Australia), among others. Her poem “Cleavage” was in the long list of the Bridport Poetry Competition 2006. She has won prizes in poetry contests in India. Her poem “March” was commended in the Writelinks’ Spring Fever Competition, 2008. Her story “Ahalya’s Valhalla” was among the notable stories of 2007 in Story South’s Million Writers’ Award. She was a participating poet in the 2008 Prakriti Foundation Poetry Festival in Chennai. She was a featured poet at the Poetry Slam organized jointly by The US Consul General, Chennai and The Prakriti Foundation in December 2009. She blogs here. Back to top.

Ann Bogle
On Whale Sound: Acceptance is to her a phenomenon
“st year I published a poetry chapbook, dog barks up a tree at the apple left in it under a deerslim moon, with the Dusie Kollektiv. In 2005, Xexoxial Editions published my prose poem chapbook, XAM: Paragraph Series. Both chapbooks are available online, as is my ebook, Solzhenitsyn Jukebox, published by Argotist Ebooks in 2010. I blog at Ana Verse. In 2009, I published Ana Verse as a blook (book of a blog). My poetry has appeared in P.F.S. Post, ~*~ W_O_M_B ~*~, ars poetica, miPOradio, Wordgathering, onedit, and Argotist Online. My short stories have appeared in The Quarterly, Fiction International, Gulf Coast, Black Ice, Big Bridge, Metazen, Istanbul Literary Review, Blip magazine, Wigleaf, and other journals. New and reprinted writings appear here. Back to top.

Bruce Bond
On Whale Sound: Choir.
Bruce Bond’s collections of poetry include Peal (Etruscan Press, 2009), Blind Rain (Finalist, The Poets’ Prize; Finalist, TIL Best Book of Poetry Prize, LSU, 2008), Cinder (Finalist, TIL Best Book of Poetry Prize, Etruscan Press, 2003), The Throats of Narcissus (University of Arkansas, 2001), Radiography (TIL Best Book of Poetry Award, BOA Editions, 1997), The Anteroom of Paradise (Colladay Award, QRL, 1991), and Independence Days (R. Gross Award, Woodley Press, 1990). His poetry has appeared in Best American Poetry, The Yale Review, The Georgia Review, Raritan, The New Republic, The Virginia Quarterly, Poetry, and many other journals, and he has received numerous honors including the Kesterson Teaching Award and fellowships from the NEA, Texas Commission on the Arts, the Institute for the Advancement of the Arts, and other organizations. Presently he is Regents Professor of English at the University of North Texas and Poetry Editor for American Literary Review. Back to top.

Ana Bozicevic
On Whale Sound: About A Fish
Ana Bozicevic is the author of Stars of the Night Commute (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2009), a Lambda Literary Award in Poetry finalist. These days she’s writing her second book, translating Croatian and Serbian poets, and co-editing the journal esque with Amy King. Back to top.

Traci Brimhall
On Whale Sound: The Sunken Gospel (originally published in the Kenyon Review Online).
Traci Brimhall is the author of Rookery (Southern Illinois University Press), winner of the 2009 Crab Orchard Series in Poetry First Book Award. Her poems have appeared in Kenyon Review Online, Slate, Virginia Quarterly Review, New England Review, The Missouri Review, and elsewhere. She was the 2008-09 Jay C. and Ruth Halls Poetry Fellow at the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing and currently teaches at Western Michigan University, where she is a doctoral associate and Kings/Chavez/Parks Fellow. Back to top.

Nick Bruno
On Whale Sound: Malinconia (originally published in Valparaiso Poetry Review.)
Nick Bruno’s poetry has appeared in publications such as: Shenandoah, Valparaiso Poetry Review, Adirondack Review, Arabesques Review, Eclectica, Blue Fifth Review, Stirring, Snow Monkey, NōD Magazine, Sidereality and the fourW eighteen Anthology. He is presently living and writing in Canada. Back to top.

Rachel Bunting
On Whale Sound: The Apiary.
Rachel lives and writes in South Jersey, somewhere between the Delaware River and the Pine Barrens. Her poems can be found in both print and online journals, and have been nominated several times for Pushcart Prizes. Her work was included in Best of the Net 2009 and Best of the Web 2010 anthologies. Rachel’s first chapbook, Ripe Again, was released in March 2008 through Finishing Line Press. She is currently at work on a full-length manuscript. In May 2010, she was selected to join Dean Young for a weeklong workshop at the Norman Mailer House in Provincetown, MA, where together with five other poets, they consumed over 300 oysters and several cases of beer in one week. Back to top.

Eric Burke
On Whale Sound Adam and Eve Next Door (originally published in JMWW).
Eric Burke works as a computer programmer in Columbus, Ohio. Recent work can be found in elimae, Pank, qarrtsiluni, A cappella Zoo, and Emprise Review. Work is forthcoming in Weave Magazine, Dark Sky Magazine and Word Riot. You can read his blog here. Back to top.

Sarah Busse
On Whale Sound: The Mothers
Sarah Busse is a co-editor of Verse Wisconsin. With an MFA from Bennington, she’s the author of Quiver (Red Dragonfly Press, 2009) and Given These Magics (Finishing Line Press, 2010). A third chapbook, Gauguin in California, is forthcoming from Desperado Press. She has been featured at Verse Daily and Your Daily Poem. Back to top.

Jessie Carty
On Whale Sound: Bat Boy Falls For Meghan McCain (originally published in Northville Review).
Jessie Carty is the author of three poetry collections but she also chisels away at prose in between teaching at RCCC in Concord, NC. You can find her editing Referential Magazine or blogging about blogging here – well, when her four cats get off the keyboard! Back to top.


Grace Cavalieri
On Whale Sound: The Protest
Grace Cavalieri is the author of several books of poetry and 23 produced plays; she founded and still produces/hosts public radio’s “The Poet and the Poem,” now in its 33rd year, now from the Library of Congress. Her new book Anna Nicole: Poems (Goss183: Casa Menendez, 2008,) won the Paterson 2009 Award for Literary Excellence. She holds the Allen Ginsberg Award for Poetry, The Bordighera Poetry Prize, and the Pen Center’s “Best Books List.” She is a poetry columnist for MiPOradio. Her play in progress, “Anna Nicole: Blonde Ambition,” will see a March 2010 reading in NYC. Casa Menendez just published her chapbook Navy Wife, c2010. Back to top.

James Cervantes
On Whale Sound: Distance.
James Cervantes is the editor of The Salt River Review, and his poetry and prose have appeared recently in the online journals Tata Nacho Press, Sol, and Hamilton Stone Review. His latest book, TEMPORARY MEANING, is available from Hamilton Stone Editions. He lives in San Miguel de Allende half of the year and is supremely happy there. Back to top.

Peter Ciccariello
On Whale Sound: A Misread
“I am an inter-disciplinary, cross-genre poet, artist, and photographer. My work has been exhibited at Harvard University, Boston, MA, The University of Arizona Poetry Center, Tucson, AZ, and at Brown University in Providence, RI. Recent work has appeared both in print & online in, amongst other places, Poetry Magazine, New River, a journal of digital writing and art, dbqp: visualizing poetics, Fogged Clarity, miPOradio, Leonardo On-Line, Rattle, Adirondack Review, and Word For/ Word. I blog here.” Back to top.

Antonia Clark
On Whale Sound: Rapprochement (originally published at 2River View).
Antonia Clark works for a medical software company in Burlington, Vermont, and is co-administrator of an online poetry workshop, The Waters. Her work has appeared in many print and electronic journals, including The 2River View, Anderbo, Apparatus Magazine, The Cortland Review, Eclectica, The Pedestal Magazine, Rattle, Soundzine, and Umbrella. She loves French food and wine, and plays French café music on a sparkly purple accordion. Back to top.


Juliet Cook
On Whale Sound: Half Moon; Sink or Float [quick fix witch].
Juliet Cook’s poetry has appeared within Action Yes, Arsenic Lobster, Columbia Poetry Review, Diagram, Diode, and many more print and online entities. She is the editor/publisher of Blood Pudding Press (print) and Thirteen Myna Birds (online). Juliet’s first full-length poetry book, Horrific Confection was published by BlazeVOX in 2008. She also has oodles of published poetry chapbooks, most recently including Soft Foam (Blood Pudding Press for Dusie Kollektiv 4), FONDANT PIG ANGST (Slash Pine Press) and Tongue Like a Stinger (Wheelhouse). She recently started submitting her second full-length collection for consideration. To find out more about all of the above and other yummy details, feel free to visit Juliet’s website. Back to top.

David Cooke
On Whale Sound: Edges
David Cooke was raised Catholic in Oakland, California, and writes and runs The Lawn Guy from his home in Portland, Oregon. Winner of the 2009 Ruth Stone Poetry Prize and nominated for a 2010 Pushcart Prize, his work most recently appeared in Hunger Mountain, Flatmancrooked and A River & Sound Review. Back to top.

Joanna Penn Cooper
On Whale Sound: I Hereby Give You Permission To Hypnotize Yourself
Joanna Penn Cooper’s creative and critical work has appeared or is forthcoming in a number of journals, including MELUS, Poetry International, South Dakota Review, Cortland Review, Opium, Supermachine, Pleiades, elimae, and Boog City. Her second chapbook of poetry and short prose pieces, Mesmer, was published in April 2010 by Dancing Girl Press. Joanna’s full-length poetry collection, How We Mostly Were, was a finalist for the Kinereth Gensler Award from Alice James Books in December 2010. Back to top.

Dawn Corrigan
On Whale Sound: The Next Morning
Dawn Corrigan writes short fiction, long fiction, nonfiction, poems, short plays, and other miscellany. Her work has appeared in print and online journals including Poetry, The Paris Review, Exquisite Corpse, Dogzplot, Monkeybicycle, Pindeldyboz and Wigleaf. From 2006 until 2009 she blogged at TheNervousBreakdown.com. She’s been an Associate Editor at Girls with Insurance since July 2009. Back to top.

Chella Courington
On Whale Sound: [a group of jellyfish is called a ‘smack.’ a group of lapwings is called a ‘deceit.’] (originally published in Pirene’s Fountain.)
Chella Courington’s recent work appears or is forthcoming in Avatar, Moria, DMQ Review, NOP Magazine, Pirene’s Fountain and Opium. Her first chapbook was Southern Girl Gone Wrong and her second chapbook of prose poetry, Girls & Women, will be published by Burning River in Spring 2011. She teaches writing and literature at Santa Barbara City College. Back to top.

Cynthia Cox
On Whale Sound: Premeditated.
Cynthia Cox resides in Richmond, Texas, with her husband and her pets. She has been writing poetry for 15 years, and has been published in such publications as Cider Press Review, Epicenter, Albatross, and qarrtsiluni. She taught high school English for ten years and recently returned to graduate school to pursue a Master’s degree in counseling. Back to top.

Jamison Crabtree
On Whale Sound: Lament for Dr. Jekyll (originally published at No Tell Motel).
Jamison Crabtree received his MFA from the University of Arizona, where he was a Beverly Rogers fellow. His poetry appears (or is forthcoming) in No Tell Motel, LIT, Best New Poets 2009, Handsome, Poor Claudia, and many other wonderful places. He lives in Tucson where he edits poetry and hand binds books for Spork Press. Back to top.

Chris Crittenden
On Whale Sound: The Gods Reflect on Creation (originally published at Temenos)
“I teach environmental ethics for the University of Maine and do much of my writing in a hut in a spruce forest, fifty miles from the nearest traffic light. I was recently interviewed on Jane Crown’s Poetry Radio.” Chris blogs at Owl Who Laughs. Back to top.


Rachel Dacus
On Whale Sound: Designer (originally published at Terrain)
Rachel Dacus is the author of Another Circle of Delight, Femme au chapeau and Earth Lessons. Her manuscript Gods of Water and Air was a semi-finalist for the 2010 Akron Poetry Prize. She has work in the anthologies Ravishing DisUnities: Real Ghazals in English, Letters to the World: Poems from the Wom-Po LISTSERV, and Beyond Forgetting: Poetry and Prose About Alzheimer’s Disease, as well as in numerous print and online magazines, including The Atlanta Review, Cortland Review, Prairie Schooner, Seneca Review and Smartish Pace. She interviews poets for Fringe magazine and blogs at Rocket Kids. The daughter of a rocket scientist, her name is on a piece of floating space junk. Back to top.

J.P. Dancing Bear
On Whale Sound: Gacela of the Foxes (originally published at Untitled Country Review).
J. P. Dancing Bear is the author of ten collections of poetry, the soon to be published Family of Marsupial Centaurs (Iris Press, 2010) and Inner Cities of Gulls (2010, Salmon Poetry). His poems have been published in Mississippi Review, Third Coast, Natural Bridge, Shenandoah, New Orleans Review, Verse Daily and many other publications. He is editor for the American Poetry Journal and Dream Horse Press. Bear also hosts the weekly hour-long poetry show, Out of Our Minds, on public station, KKUP. Back to top.

Laura E. Davis
On Whale Sound: On Rainy Nights I Dream I Am Pregnant (originally published at Radioactive Moat)
Laura E. Davis is from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the City of Champions. She is currently an MFA candidate in poetry and nonfiction at Chatham University. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Splinter Generation, Redactions, Meadowland Review, The Ante Review, Pear Noir!, and Caper Literary Journal. She teaches gifted education and is the Founding Editor of Weave Magazine. Back to top.

Kwame Dawes
On Whale Sound: Rituals Before the Poem (will appear in a new collection Wheels [Peepal Tree Press, UK] in November 2010.)

Born in Ghana in 1962, Kwame Dawes spent most of his childhood and early adult life in Jamaica. He is a writer of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and plays. As a poet, he is profoundly influenced by the rhythms and textures of that lush place, citing in a recent interview his “spiritual, intellectual, and emotional engagement with reggae music.” His book Bob Marley: Lyrical Genius remains the most authoritative study of the lyrics of Bob Marley.

Dawes has published fifteen collections of poetry. His most recent titles include Back of Mount Peace (2009); Hope’s Hospice (2009); Wisteria, finalist for the Patterson Memorial Prize; Impossible Flying (2007); and Gomer’s Song (2007). Progeny of Air (Peepal Tree, 1994) was the winner of the Forward Poetry Prize for Best First Collection in the UK. Other poetry collections include Resisting the Anomie (Goose Lane, 1995); Prophets (Peepal Tree, 1995); Jacko Jacobus, (Peepal Tree, 1996); and Requiem, (Peepal Tree. 1996), a suite of poems inspired by the illustrations of African American artist, Tom Feelings in his landmark book The Middle Passage: White Ships/Black Cargo; and Shook Foil (Peepal Tree, 1998), a collection of reggae-inspired poems. His book, Midland, was awarded the Hollis Summers Poetry Prize by the Ohio University Press (2001). In 2001, Dawes was a winner of a Pushcart Prize for the best American poetry of 2001 for his long poem, “Inheritance.”

Dawes is Distinguished Poet in Residence, Louis Frye Scudder Professor of Liberal Arts and founder and executive director of the South Carolina Poetry Initiative. He is the director of the University of South Carolina Arts Institute and the programming director of the Calabash International Literary Festival, which takes place in Jamaica in May of each year.

Dawes’ blog posts for the Poetry Foundation blog Harriet can be read here. Back to top.

Nick Demske
On Whale Sound: KISSMARRIAGE (originally published in Thieves Jargon)
Nick Demske lives in Racine, Wisconsin, and works there at the Racine Public Library. His self-titled manuscript was chosen by Joyelle McSweeney for the 2010 Fence Modern Poets Series prize and was published in November of 2010. He’s a curator of the BONK! Performance series, a founder of The Racquetball Chapbook Tournament and an editor of the online venue boo: a journal of terrific things. His work has been published by Action Yes, Conduit, Sawbuck, Moria and many other places. Visit him sometime at nickipoo.wordpress.com. Back to top.

Nicole Cartwright Denison
On Whale Sound: Old Medicine Poem (originally published at Blue Fifth Review)
Nicole Cartwright Denison lives on a trout farm in western North Carolina, is the author of three chapbooks and a Best New Poets, Best of the Net and Pushcart Prize nominee. Work is forthcoming in or has appeared in A Trunk of Delirium, Weave, Juked, Diagram, No Tell Motel, Press 1, Arsenic Lobster, WOMB, elimae, The Pedestal Magazine and others. Photography has appeared in Southern Women’s Review, Stirring, Digital Paper and Lily. You can find her on the porch or driving through the river gorge. Back to top.

Nancy Devine
On Whale Sound: Kingdom.
Nancy Devine teaches high school English in Grand Forks, ND. She co-directs the Red River Valley Writing Project, a local site of the National Writing Project. Her poetry, short fiction and essays have appeared in online and print journals. Back to top.

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Carolina Ebeid
On Whale Sound: Something Brighter Than Pity; Like the First Untethered Flight of the Hot-Air Balloon.
Carolina Ebeid’s work appears in journals such as Poetry, Gulf Coast, Fugue and Copper Nickel. Originally from New Jersey, she now lives in Austin where she is a fellow at the Michener Center for Writers completing her first manuscript.Back to top.

Susan Elbe
On Whale Sound: How To Fall In Love (originally published at diode).
Susan Elbe is the author of Eden in the Rearview Mirror (Word Press) and a chapbook, Light Made from Nothing (Parallel Press). Her poems appear or are forthcoming in many journals and anthologies, including Blackbird, diode, MARGIE, North American Review, Salt Hill, and A Fierce Brightness: Twenty-five Years of Women’s Poetry (Calyx Books). She lives in Madison, Wisconsin where she works as a webmaster. You can learn more about her here. Back to top.

Theresa Senato Edwards
On Whale Sound: Monochrome Man (originally published at Caper Literary Journal)
Theresa Senato Edwards’ first book of poems, Voices Through Skin, was published June 2011, Sibling Rivalry Press. Her second manuscript completed, Painting Czeslawa Kwoka ~ Honoring Children of the Holocaust, is a full-color collaboration of paintings and poetry with painter Lori Schreiner. Work from this can be found online at AdmitTwo, Autumn Sky Poetry, elimae, Trickhouse, and BleakHouse Publishing. The title piece, “Painting Czeslawa Kwoka,” won the Tacenda Literary Award for Best Collaboration 2007; and another piece in the collaboration, “A Last Look,” won this same award in 2010. Theresa teaches and tutors at Marist College, is a scholar-facilitator for the NY Council for the Humanities, is founder of Holly Rose Review (now archived online), and blogs at TACSE creations. Back to top.

Neil Ellman
On Whale Sound: The Universe (originally published at Bolts of Silk).
Neil Ellman is a retired educator living and writing in New Jersey. His poetry appears in numerous national and international print and online journals, in addition to four ekphrastic chapbooks. Back to top.

Jill Alexander Essbaum
On Whale Sound: Lament (originally published at No Tell Motel).
JAE is the author of several books of poetry including Harlot (No Tell Books, 2007) and the poem-length chapbook The Devastation (Cooper Dillon Books, 2009). She lives in Austin, Texas, and spends way, way, way too much time on Facebook. Back to top.

Justin Evans
On Whale Sound: Ephemeris (first published in diode).
Justin Evans lives with his wife and three sons in rural Nevada, where he teaches History and English. He is the author of three chapbooks of poetry, the most recent being Working in the Bird House (Foothills, 2008). His first full length book, Town for the Trees, is forthcoming this year from Foothills as well. Ephemeris comes from his recently completed manuscript, Sailing this Nameless Ship, which is slowly making the rounds. Back to top.

Patricia Fargnoli
On Whale Sound: The Rising and Falling of Trees.

Patricia, the New Hampshire Poet Laureate from December 2006 to March 2009, is the author of four books and two chapbooks of poetry. Her newest book, Then, Something (Tupelo Press, fall 2009) won the ForeWord Poetry Book of the Year Award Silver Award. Her fifth collection, Duties of the Spirit ( Tupelo Press, 2005) won the New Hampshire Jane Kenyon Literary Book Award for an Outstanding Book of Poetry and was a semifinalist for the Glasgow Prize. Her first book, Necessary Light (Utah State University Press, 1999) was awarded the 1999 May Swenson Poetry Award judged by Mary Oliver. “Pat”, a retired social worker, has been the recipient of a Macdowell Colony fellowship. She’s been on the residence faculty of The Frost Place Poetry Festival, and has taught at the New Hampshire Institute of Art and in the Lifelong Learning program of Keene State College. She was the recipient of an honorary BFA from the NH Institute of Arts, has won the Robert Frost Foundation Poetry Award and 6 Pushcart nominations. Twice a semifinalist for the Discovery, The Nation Awards, she has published widely in literary journals such as Poetry, Ploughshares, North American Review, Mid-American Review, Alaska Quarterly, Massachusetts Review, etc. She currently resides in Walpole, NH. Back to top.

Ruth Foley
On Whale Sound: The Greatest Sin is to be Unconscious (originally published in Umbrella)
Ruth Foley lives in Massachusetts, where she teaches English for Wheaton College. Her recent work is appearing or forthcoming in River Styx, Measure, amphibi.us, The Smoking Poet, Prime Number Magazine, and Umbrella, which just nominated “The Greatest Sin is to be Unconscious” for a Pushcart Prize. She also serves as Associate Poetry Editor for Cider Press Review. Back to top.

Adam Ford
On Whale Sound: I Must Destroy The Space Whale
Adam Ford is a poet and novelist from the small town of Chewton in South-Eastern Australia. His third and latest volume of poetry is The Third Fruit is a Bird, published by Picaro Press in 2008. He is also responsible for the novel Man Bites Dog, the occasional zine Jutchy Ya Ya and the comics The Amazing Atavistic Adventures of The Fish, The Book of Job and The Lives and Times of Jerry the Nerky Lizard. Back to top.

Michaela Gabriel
On Whale Sound: The Driving Instructor Has A Recurring Nightmare (originally published in Eclectica).
Michaela A. Gabriel lives in Vienna, Austria, where she works as an English teacher for adults and a translator. She has been published in English, German, Italian, and Polish, both online and in print, and is the author of two and a half chapbooks: apples for adam, the secret meanings of greek letters, small confessions and pebbles of regrets (with Alex Stolis). Although afflicted by writer’s block for a while now, she has not entirely given up hope that she will one day finish her full length manuscript, elemental. Back to top.

John Gallaher
On Whale Sound: Anecdote of the Field
‘Anecdote of the Field’ is from John Gallaher’s second book, The Little Book of Guesses, winner of the Levis Poetry Prize, from Four Way Books. His other books include, Map of the Folded World, from The University of Akron Press, and Your Father on the Train of Ghosts, co-authored with G.C. Walrep, due out in Spring 2011 from BOA Editions.Back to top.

Bernadette Geyer
On Whale Sound: Gift (originally published at fiera lingue).
Bernadette Geyer is the author of the poetry chapbook, What Remains (Argonne House Press), and recipient of a 2010 Strauss Fellowship from the Arts Council of Fairfax County. Her poems have appeared in Verse Daily, Los Angeles Review, Hotel Amerika, and elsewhere. Geyer works as a freelance writer and editor in the Washington, D.C., area. Back to top.

Howard Good
On Whale Sound: Lovesick and Bingo (both originally published at Juked)
Howie Good is the author of the full-length poetry collections Lovesick (Press Americana, 2009), Heart With a Dirty Windshield (BeWrite Books, 2010), and Everything Reminds Me of Me (Desperanto, 2011), as well as 25 previous print and digital poetry chapbooks. Back to top.

Brent Goodman
On Whale Sound: Coat Rack.
Brent Goodman is an internet creative professional living in Rhinelander, Wisconsin, and the author of The Brother Swimming Beneath Me (2009 Black Lawrence Press). His work has appeared in Poetry, Gulf Coast, Zone 3, Diode, Cimarron Review and elsewhere. Back to top.

Rebecca Goss
On Whale Sound: Mrs. Quigley and I (originally published at Magma)
“I grew up in Suffolk and now live in Liverpool. My poems have been published in many literary magazines and broadcast on Radio 4. My first full length collection The Anatomy of Structures was published by Flambard Press in 2010. ‘Mrs Quigley and ‘I was Highly Commended in The Forward Prize 2010.” Back to top.

Uma Gowrishankar
On Whale Sound: The Lotus Under My Feet
Uma Gowrishankar lives in Chennai, South India. She works as an education consultant for a cluster of schools that offer a meaningful learning program to rural and small urban communities. She paints and practices yoga. She maintains a terrace garden in the middle of the noisy and populated city: she clears space in her garden and poetry for the many demands her crowded day make. Back to top.

Lea Graham
On Whale Sound: Crush before the Sexual Revolution (originally published in Connotations)
“My first book, Hough & Helix & Where & Here & You, You, You is forthcoming this August through No Tell Books. It will be the featured book for The Rumpus poetry book club in July. My work on and off-line has been published in places like Moria, No Tell Motel, Notre Dame Review, Ships That Pass Blog, and Mudlark. I am an Assistant Professor at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, NY.” Back to top.

Alex Grant
On Whale Sound: Secret Sonnet to the Cockroach (from the collection Fear of Moving Water).
Alex Grant’s Chains & Mirrors won the 2007 Oscar Arnold Young Award (Best Collection by a North Carolina poet) and the 2006 Randall Jarrell Poetry Prize. Fear of Moving Water, his 2009 collection, was a finalist for a number of national book contests and runner-up for the 2010 Brockman Campbell award(Best North Carolina Poetry Collection) and the 2010 Oscar Arnold Young Award. The Circus Poems was released by Lorimer Press in September 2010. A four-time Pushcart and Best of The Web nominee, he has received the Kakalak Poetry Prize and The Pavel Srut Poetry Fellowship, and his poems have appeared in many national journals, including The Missouri Review, Best New Poets 2007, Arts & Letters, The Connecticut Review and Verse Daily. A native Scot, he lives in Chapel Hill NC, with his wife, his dangling participles and his Celtic fondness for excess. He can be found on the web here. Back to top.

Kimberly Grey
On Whale Sound: Poem For My Ribs (originally published in DIAGRAM).
Kimberly Grey lives in New York City. Her poems have recently appeared or are forthcoming in TriQuarterly, The Awl, Linebreak, The Brooklyn Review, Anti-, and other journals. She will teach contemporary poetry at Adelphi University in 2011. Back to top.

Carol Guess
On Whale Sound: Coyotes, Motor Oil, Chiffon (originally published in No Tell Motel).
Carol Guess is the author of seven books of poetry and prose, including Tinderbox Lawn and Homeschooling. A new prose poetry collection, Doll Studies: Forensics, is forthcoming from Black Lawrence Press in 2012. Find out more here. Back to top.

Carolyn Guinzio
On Whale Sound: A History of Stone and Shadow (first published in Dear Camera).
Carolyn Guinzio is the author of two collections, Quarry, and West Pullman, and two chapbooks, Untitled Wave and the forthcoming Sing/e. Back to top.


Justin Hamm
On Whale Sound: Uncle Fat Elvis (originally published at The Battered Suitcase)
Originally from the flatlands of Central Illinois, Justin Hamm now lives near Mark Twain Territory in Missouri. He is the author of the chapbook Illinois, My Apologies, due out in 2011 from RockSaw Press. His work has appeared, or is forthcoming, in Nimrod International Journal, The New York Quarterly, Cream City Review, Spoon River Poetry Review, and a host of other publications. Justin earned his MFA from Southern Illinois University Carbondale and blogs here. Back to top.

Shannon Elizabeth Hardwick
On Whale Sound: Book of Gaigemon III
Shannon Elizabeth Hardwick graduated with her Masters in Fine Arts from Sarah Lawrence College in 2010. She recently completed her first full-length manuscript of essays and poetry and has a chapbook in print. Some of her work has been featured or is upcoming in magazines in the US and UK, including: 3:AM Magazine, Night Train, Phantom Kangaroo, chum, Sein und Werden, among others. She writes in New York and Texas. Back to top.

Ron Hardy
On Whale Sound: A Wind Disorder
Ron Hardy continues to live and work in northern Ohio, south of a Great Lake. His children no longer require triangulation to locate. They are under foot again. His poems have appeared in Right Hand Pointing and Escape into Life. Many of them are running loose in his blog fruitflyby. Back to top.


Joseph Harker
On Whale Sound: The Sounding Line
Joseph Harker is the pseudonym of a twentysomething graduate student living in Washington, D.C. In between this and that, he has been known to enjoy writing a poem or three. You can read some of them in journals like Ganymede, Chantarelle’s Notebook, and Qarrtsiluni, or you can visit his blog, where he has been known to make appearances. Back to top.

Joshua Harmon
On Whale Sound: The absent tenant’s electricity (originally published at AGNI online).
Joshua Harmon is the author of three books – Le Spleen de Poughkeepsie (winner of the 2010 Akron Poetry Prize), Scape (poems, 2009), and Quinnehtukqut (a novel, 2007)-as well as a chapbook, The Poughkeepsiad. His poetry, fiction, and nonfiction have appeared widely in journals, and he has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts. He no longer lives in Poughkeepsie. Back to top.

Pamela Hart
On Whale Sound: Sometimes A Bone (originally published in Big City Lit).
“I’m a former journalist. My work has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has been published in journals like Rattapallax, Lumina. BigCityLit, qarrtsiluni and Kalliope. Among other occupations, I’m writer in residence at the Katonah Museum of Art. I recently was named a fellow at the new Purchase College NY Writers Center. My chapbook, The End of the Body, was published by toadlily press in 2006.” Back to top.

Crystal J. Hoffman
On Whale Sound: How Myths Learn to Eat (first published in A Cappella Zoo).
Crystal Hoffman’s poetry has appeared in a number of journals, such as Moloch Journal, A Capella Zoo, FRiGG, Weave, and Maintentant: Dada Poetry. She is co-founder and Artistic Director of The TypewriterGirls Poetry Cabaret and runs The Poets Playshop. Both organizations are dedicated to keeping Dada and Surrealist performance and composition alive for future generations. She also teaches composition and literature at community colleges and attempts to create change and beauty through all means at her disposal. Back to top.


M.E. Hope
On Whale Sound: Cow Songs (originally published in Rattle)
“My chapbook The past is clean was released by Uttered Chaos in 2010. I am a past recipient of a Fishtrap fellowship, recent work has been included in the anthology, New Poets of the American West; The Jefferson Monthly; and Cloudbank. I live in Southern Oregon with my husband of nearly a quarter century, in our semi-empty nest.” Back to top.


Amorak Huey
On Whale Sound: Antecedent
Amorak Huey recently left the newspaper business to teach writing at Grand Valley State University in Michigan. He is managing editor of the online journal Wake: Great Lakes Thought & Culture. His poems have appeared in Rattle, Linebreak, Oxford American, Crab Orchard Review, PANK, Contrary and many other journals. New poems will appear this spring in The Southern Review and Indiana Review, among other places. Back to top.

Rose Hunter
On Whale Sound: To The River (originally published at Juked.)
“I blog at Whoever Brought Me Here Will Have to Take Me Home. To The River is from my forthcoming poetry book of the same name (Artistically Declined Press, November 2010). At the moment I am halfway between Mexico and Australia – with the most important parts of me in Mexico. Although I’m in Australia at the moment.” Back to top.

Jennifer Jean
On Whale Sound: Fishwife Advent
I’m the author of the poetry chapbook In the War (Big Table Publishing Co., 2010); my poetry, essays, literary interviews, and reviews have been published in numerous journals, including North Dakota Quarterly, Denver Quarterly, Awakenings Review, Santa Clara Review, Southern California Review, Caketrain, Relief Quarterly, The Wilderness House Review, The MOM Egg Journal, Art Throb and Megaera; as well, I’ve received an Agnes Butler Award from the Academy of American Poets, I direct Thursday’s Theatre of Words & Music artist’s performance series, and teach writing and literature at Salem State University. More here. Back to top.

Charles Jensen
On Whale Sound: Joseph Smith’s Prayer for the God Made Flesh (originally published at Clementine Magazine).
Charles Jensen is the author of The First Risk, which was a finalist for the 2010 Lambda Literary Award. His poems appear in The Journal, New England Review, Willow Springs, and Yalobusha Review. He’s the founding editor of LOCUSPOINT, which explores creative work on a city by city basis. Back to top.

Dick Jones
On Whale Sound: La Chartreuse de La Verne.
“Initially wooed by the First World War poets and then seduced by the Beats, I have been exploring the vast territories in between since the age of 15. Fitfully published in a variety of magazines throughout the years of rambling – Orbis, The Interpreter’s House, Poetry Ireland Review, Qarrtsiluni, Westwords, Mipoesias, Three Candles, Other Poetry and others. Grand plans for the meisterwerk have been undermined constantly either by a Much Better Idea or a sort of Chekhovian inertia. Day-to-day, I look after the kids and housekeep and for fun and profit I play bass in a ceilidh band and a blues trio. Back to top.


Patricia Wallace Jones
On Whale Sound: Days She Was Queen (originally published in The Flea)
Patricia Wallace Jones is a mother whose sons raised her–a life-long artist and retired disability advocate who began writing poetry after retiring from the Midwest to the northern California coast. Her art is in private collections and her poems and/or art have appeared in The Avatar Review, Lily, Tilt, Lucid Rhythms, The Guardian, 14 by 14, The Chimaera, The Flea, Wordgathering, The Shit Creek Review, The Centrifugal Eye, Victorian Violet Press and can be found among many poets she admires in Noted on the Alsop Review. When time allows, she tries to post daily here. Back to top.


Kirstin Kaschock
On Whale Sound: The Invalid (originally published in Octopus Magazine)
Kirsten Kaschock is the author of two books of poetry: A Beautiful Name for a Girl (Ahsahta Press) and Unfathoms (Slope Editions). Her novel, Sleight, will be published by Coffee House Press in fall 2011. She has earned a Ph.D. in English from the University of Georgia and is currently a doctoral fellow in dance at Temple University. Kirsten lives in Manayunk with her three sons, their father, and a small boxful of Needs. Back to top.

Aseem Kaul
On Whale Sound: Trumpet Solo (originally published in Blood Orange Review).
Aseem Kaul lives in Minneapolis, where he is Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota. Aseem’s work has appeared or is forthcoming in Blood Orange Review, The Cortland Review, RHINO, Mascara, and nthposition among others, and a collection of his short fiction, titled études, was published in 2009. A complete listing of Aseem’s publications can be found here. Back to top.


Collin Kelley
On Whale Sound: After Adultery (first published in Blue Fifth Review).
Collin Kelley is a novelist and poet from Atlanta, Georgia. His debut novel, Conquering Venus, is out now from Vanilla Heart Publishing. His poetry collections include After the Poison, Slow To Burn and Better To Travel. He is a multiple Pushcart Prize nominee and a recipient of the 2007 Georgia Author of the Year/Taran Memorial Award from the Georgia Writers Association at Kennesaw State University. His poetry has appeared in journals and anthologies around the world, including Atlanta Review, Chattahoochee Review, Terminus, New Delta Review, Chiron Review, Blue Fifth Review, Ecotone, MiPOesias and Tears in the Fence. Kelley is also co-editor of the award-winning Java Monkey Speaks anthology series from Poetry Atlanta Press. Back to top.


Karen Kelsay
On Whale Sound: Latticework originally published at Victorian Violet Press
Karen Kelsay is a three-time Pushcart Prize nominee, who enjoys writing formal and free verse poetry. Her work has been accepted in a variety of journals, including Trinacria, The HyperTexts, Boston Literary Magazine, Toasted Cheese Literary Journal, and The Flea. She was recently a featured poet The New Formalist. Back to top.

Adele Kenny
On Whale Sound: The Trains
Adele Kenny; is the author of 23 books (poetry & nonfiction). Her poems, reviews, and articles have been published worldwide, and her poems have appeared in books and anthologies published by Crown, Tuttle, Shambhala, and McGraw-Hill. Among other awards, she is the recipient of two NJ State Arts Council poetry fellowships. A former professor of creative writing, she is currently founding director of the Carriage House Poetry Series and poetry editor of Tiferet. Back to top.

Lissa Kiernan
On Whale Sound: Closer (originally published at qarrtsiluni)
Lissa Kiernan lives in Brooklyn, NY with her husband Chris and a fluctuating number of felines. She is the poetry editor for Arsenic Lobster Poetry Journal and founder of online poetry community The Rooster Moans. Her work can be seen or is forthcoming in such places as Canary, a Literary Journal of the Environmental Crisis, unSplendid, Redheaded Stepchild, MiPOesias, Swell, and The Yale Journal for the Humanities in Medicine. More information can be found here. Back to top.

Tess Kincaid
On Whale Sound: Infinity
Tess Kincaid is a self-proclaimed magpie, poet, Hoosier by birth, who lives in small town Ohio at Willow Manor, a ramshackle limestone house on the banks of the Scioto River, with her husband and resident ghosts. You can visit her here. Back to top.

Amy King
On Whale Sound: A Hole In My Name
Amy King’s latest book is Slaves to Do These Things (Blazevox) and forthcoming I Want to Make You Safe (Litmus Press). King moderates the Poetics List (SUNY-Buffalo/University of Pennsylvania) and the Women’s Poetry Listserv (WOMPO). She also teaches English and Creative Writing at SUNY Nassau Community College. She is currently preparing a book of interviews with the poet, Ron Padgett. She co-edits two magazines: Esque and Poets for Living Waters. Back to top.


Kathleen Kirk
On Whale Sound: The Way Back (First published in Apparatus Magazine.)
Kathleen Kirk is poetry editor for Escape Into Life, and formerly on the editorial staffs of Poetry East and RHINO. Her poems appear online in Apparatus, Leveler, and Oklahoma Review, and in a variety of print journals, including Greensboro Review, Poems & Plays, and Spoon River Poetry Review. She has three chapbooks: Selected Roles (Moon Journal Press, 2006), Broken Sonnets (Finishing Line Press, 2009), and Living on the Earth (Finishing Line Press, 2010, New Women’s Voices No. 74). She muses on what we read, and why, in her blog. Back to top.

Christine Klocek-Lim
On Whale Sound: Boulder Caves; Raguel.
Christine received the 2009 Ellen La Forge Memorial Prize in poetry. She has two chapbooks: How to photograph the heart (The Lives You Touch Publications) and The book of small treasures (Seven Kitchens Press). Her poems have appeared in Nimrod, Diode, Poets and Artists (O&S), Riffing on Strings: Creative Writing Inspired by String Theory and elsewhere. She edits Autumn Sky Poetry. Back to top.

Christine Boyka Kluge
On Whale Sound: They Seek An Inky Elixir.
Christine is the author of Stirring the Mirror (2007) and Teaching Bones to Fly (2003), both from Bitter Oleander Press. Her chapbook, Domestic Weather, won the 2003 Uccelli Press Chapbook Contest. She is also a visual artist. <a href=”#top”>Back to top.

Jee Leong Koh
On Whale Sound: Childhood Punishments (originally published at kartika review).
Jee Leong Koh is the author of two book of poems Payday Loans and Equal to the Earth (Bench Press). His new book Seven Studies for a Self Portrait will be released by the same press in March 2011. Born and raised in Singapore, he lives in New York City, and blogs at Song of a Reformed Headhunter. Back to top.

Namita Krishnamurthy
On Whale Sound: let us imagine
Namita Krishnamurthy lives in Kerala, India and has been previously published in journals such as tongues of the ocean, Side Stream, Ultraviolet etc. She enjoys reading Neruda, Carol Ann Duffy and Plath, and also spends a fair amount of her time sleeping. Her work can be found here. Back to top.

W. F. Lantry
On Whale Sound: Nightbird (originally published in Soundzine)
W.F. Lantry, a native of San Diego, received his Licence and Maîtrise from the Université de Nice, M.A. in English from Boston University and Ph.D. in Literature and Creative Writing from the University of Houston. He won the CutBank 2010 Patricia Goedicke Prize and the 2010 Lindberg Foundation International Peace Prize in Israel. His work has appeared in Gulf Coast, Prairie Fire, Literal Latté, Cha: An Asian Literary Journal, Now Culture and The Wallace Stevens Journal. He currently works in Washington, DC. and is a contributing editor of Umbrella: A Journal of Poetry and Kindred Prose. Back to top.

Kristin LaTour
On Whale Sound: reading of: The Greatest Sin is to be Unconscious by Ruth Foley
Kristin’s poetry can be found at her webpage and at the following websites: http://protestpoems.org, http://newversenews.org, http://lafovea.com, waiting4thebus.com. She’s on Facebook, and teaches at Joliet Jr. College. She also has work in print, including two chapbooks, Town Limits: Red Beaver Lake, Minnesota from Pudding House Press, and Blood from Naked Mannequin Press. Both are available via her website. Back to top.

Ann Neuser Lederer
On Whale Sound: Bits of Advice (originally published at 2River View)
Ann Neuser Lederer was born in Ohio and has also lived and worked in Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Kentucky. Her poems and creative nonfiction appear in journals such as Diagram, MiPo, and Brevity, anthologies such as Letters To the World: Poems from the Wom-po Listserv, Bedside Guide, Best of the Net, and The Country Doctor Revisited; and chapbooks Approaching Freeze,The Undifferentiated, and Weaning the Babies. She is employed as a nurse in Kentucky. Back to top.

C.A. Leibow
On Whale Sound: The Last Locomotive. (First published at Arsenic Lobster.)
Christopher is currently a Barker for the Shlomo Brother’s Carnival and is currently working on a manuscript titled, Carny Life: The Vicissitudes of Traveling Entertainment. Back to top.


Mari L’Esperance
On Whale Sound: The Poppy Field (originally published at Connotation Press)
Born in Kobe, Japan, Mari L’Esperance is a Hapa poet whose first full-length collection The Darkened Temple was awarded the 2007 Prairie Schooner Book Prize in Poetry and published by the University of Nebraska Press in September 2008. An earlier collection Begin Here was awarded a Sarasota Poetry Theatre Press Chapbook Prize. A graduate of the Creative Writing Program at New York University, former New York Times Company Foundation Creative Writing Fellow, and recipient of residency fellowships from Hedgebrook and Dorland Mountain Arts Colony, L’Esperance lives and writes in the San Francisco Bay Area. Back to top.

Frannie Lindsay
On Whale Sound: Nowhere Near Bethlehem.
Frannie’s third volume of poetry, Mayweed, won the Washington Prize in 2009, and was published by The Word Works. Her previous books are Lamb (Perugia) and Where She Always Was (Utah State University Press). Her awards include the Missouri Review Prize, Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellowship, and the National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship. Back to top.

Sarah Lindsay
On Whale Sound: Olduvai Gorge Thorn Tree (originally published in Sarah’s collection Mount Clutter, 2002 and used here with the permission of the publisher, Grove/Atlantic, Inc.)
Sarah Lindsay, a recipient of a Lannan Literary Fellowship, is the author of Primate Behavior (1997), Mount Clutter (2002), and Twigs and Kucklebones (2008). She works as a copy editor, plays the cello, and lives among stacks of books with her husband and dog. Back to top.

Nicholas Liu
On Whale Sound: Here Is Your Word List For The Week, Good Luck (originally published in Stride Magazine).
Nicholas Liu lives in Singapore. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in magazines including elimae, Poetry Review, nthposition and Stand. He is currently editing the anthology Storm Glass: Singapore Poets Before Their First Books (Firstfruits Publications). He blogs intermittently at The Placeholder. Back to top.

Reb Livingston
On Whale Sound: Lament for Origin; Spell for Sipping Elixir and Not Being Learnt by Sunwurst (first published in Anti-).
Reb Livingston is the author of God Damsel (No Tell Books, 2010), Your Favorite Ten Words (Coconut Books, 2007) and co-editor of The Bedside Guide to No Tell Motel anthology series. She’s also the editor of No Tell Motel and publisher of No Tell Books. Back to top.

Diane Lockward
On Whale Sound: Gender Issue (published in Poemeleon).
Diane Lockward is the author of three poetry books, most recently, Temptation by Water. Her previous books are What Feeds Us, which received the 2006 Quentin R. Howard Poetry Prize, and Eve’s Red Dress. Her poems have been included in such anthologies as Poetry Daily: 360 Poems from the World’s Most Popular Poetry Website and Garrison Keillor’s Good Poems for Hard Times, and have been published in such journals as Harvard Review, Spoon River Poetry Review, and Prairie Schooner. Her work has also been featured on Poetry Daily, Verse Daily, and The Writer’s Almanac. She lives in northern New Jersey and works as a poet-in-the-schools for both the New Jersey State Council on the Arts and the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. She blogs at Blogalicious. Back to top.

Patricia Lockwood
On Whale Sound: Death By Precipitation.
Patricia’s poems “have gonna appeared” in Gulf Coast, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Black Warrior Review, VQR and POETRY. She blogs at Emperor of Ice Cream Cakes. Back to top.

Sandy Longhorn
On Whale Sound: The Interior Weather of Tree-Clinging Birds (originally published in Other Voices International
Sandy Longhorn is the author of Blood Almanac (Anhinga Press, 2006), which won the 2005 Anhinga Prize for Poetry. New poems are forthcoming or have appeared recently in The Collagist, The Dirty Napkin, Lake Effect, Redivider, Spillway, and elsewhere. Longhorn lives in Little Rock, AR, is an Arkansas Arts Council fellow, and blogs at Myself the only Kangaroo among the Beauty. Back to top.

Helen Losse
On Whale Sound: (Obsolete) Mare, the April Fragment (originally published in Referential Magazine)
Helen Losse is a Winston-Salem poet, the author of Better With Friends (Rank Stranger Press, 2009) and two chapbooks, Gathering the Broken Pieces and Paper Snowflakes. Her second book, Seriously Dangerous, is forthcoming from Main Street Rag in 2011. Her recent poetry publications and acceptances include The Wild Goose Poetry Review, Main Street Rag, Iodine Poetry Review, Blue Fifth Review, Referential Magazine, The Pedestal Magazine, ken*again, and Literary Trails of the North Carolina Piedmont. Helen’s poems have been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and twice for a Best of the Net award, one of which was a finalist. She is the Poetry Editor for online literary magazine The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature. Back to top.

Bridget Lowe
On Whale Sound: Poem for Virginia as Joan of Arc (originally published at nth position)
Bridget Lowe’s poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Ploughshares, The New Republic, Best American Poetry (forthcoming), Boston Review, and Denver Quarterly, among others. She has received a “Discovery”/Boston Review prize and was recently the 2011 Rona Jaffe Foundation Fellow at The MacDowell Colony. She currently lives in Kansas City. More information here. Back to top.

Rebecca Loudon
On Whale Sound: An Ode to Drunkenness and Other Criminal Activities
Rebecca Loudon lives and writes in Seattle. Her most recent collection of poetry is Cadaver Dogs from No Tell Books. She is currently working on a manuscript titled Queer Wing-ed about the inner workings of the mind of Henry Darger. She teaches violin to children and maintains a blog here. Back to top.

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Aditi Machado
On Whale Sound: If You Were A Bird (originally published in New Quest).
Aditi Machado’s work has appeared in journals such as qarrtsiluni, Eclectica, Mimesis and nthposition, among others. In 2009 she received the Srinivas Rayaprol Poetry Prize and the TFA Award for Creative Writing. Aditi is from Bangalore, India, but is currently pursuing an MFA degree at Washington University in St LouisBack to top.

Amy MacLennan
On Whale Sound: Runaway Truck Ramp (originally published at Literary Bohemian).
Amy MacLennan has been published in Hayden’s Ferry Review, River Styx, Linebreak, Cimarron Review, Folio and Rattle. Her poems have appeared in the anthologies Not a Muse from Haven Books and Eating Her Wedding Dress: A Collection of Clothing Poems from Ragged Sky Press. One of her poems is available as a downloadable broadside from Broadsided Press, and she has an article appearing in the 2011 Poet’s Market. Back to top.

Anthony Madrid
On Whale Sound: That She Is In Love With A Wretch Like That (originally published in Web Conjunctions.
Anthony Madrid lives in Chicago. His poems have recently appeared or are forthcoming in AGNI Online, Boston Review, Gulf Coast, Iowa Review, LIT, Poetry, 6X6, and WEB CONJUNCTIONS. His manuscript is called THE 580 STROPHES. Back to top.

Marie-Elizabeth Mali
On Whale Sound: Lungs
Marie-Elizabeth Mali is the author of Steady, My Gaze (Tebot Bach) forthcoming in 2011. She is a co-curator of louderARTS: the Reading Series and the Page Meets Stage reading series, both in New York City. Her work has appeared in Calyx, MiPOesias and RATTLE, among others. For more information please visit here. Back to top.

Clare L. Martin
On Whale Sound: Eating the Heart First.
Clare Martin is a poet/mother/wife, a graduate of the University of Southwestern Louisiana and lifelong Louisiana resident. Clare’s creative writing has appeared in Avatar Review, Poets and Artists (O&S), Blue Fifth Review, Eclectica Magazine, The Dead Mule, and Scythe, among others. She has work forthcoming in Literary Mama. Her poems have been included in the anthologies: The Red Room: Writings from Press 1, Best of Farmhouse Magazine Vol. 1, and Beyond Katrina. Her work has been nominated for Best of the Net and Best New Poets. Back to top.

Dana Guthrie Martin
On Whale Sound: Hallucination #1 and Letter From A Parasitic Head (originally published at qarrtsiluni).
Dana and her partner live in the Seattle area. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in numerous journals. Her chapbooks include The Spare Room (Blood Pudding Press, 2009) and In the Space Where I Was, forthcoming from Slack Buddha Press. She writes at My Gorgeous Somewhere. Back to top.

Frances Ruhlen McConnel
On Whale Sound: Old Mother Moon (published in Salt River Review).
Frances Ruhlen McConnel’s latest book, The Direction of Longing, was published by Bellowing Ark Press in 2007. Recently, her work has appeared in Poemeleon, The Cimmeron Review and the haiku anthology Above the Treeline. She is presently co-chair of the steering committee for a poetry series at Claremont Public Library. She also teaches a writing class for seniors. Back to top.

Melissa McEwen
On Whale Sound: Honey Babe (originally published in MiPOesias).
“I am the poetry editor for Poets & Artists. My poems and short stories have been published in Rattle, MiPOesias, Ocho, Dead Mule School of Southern Literature, and various online sites. I am also the author of Saturday Pie, a chapbook published by Goss 183 Casa Menendez. Back to top.

Michelle McGrane
On Whale Sound: The Escape Artist (originally published in Magma 46)
Michelle McGrane lives in Johannesburg, South Africa, and blogs at Peony Moon. Her collection, The Suitable Girl, is forthcoming in 2010. Back to top.

Didi Menendez
On Whale Sound: Armadillo’s Armor
Didi Menendez is a Cuban-born American artist. She is the publisher of MiPOesias and Poets and Artists. She blogs rarely but may be found at times here. Back to top.

Michelle Menting
On Whale Sound: Homecoming (originally published at Failbetter)
Michelle Menting has published poetry and nonfiction in Ascent, Diagram, Fringe Magazine, Pank, Opium, Superstition Review, and elsewhere. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Creative Writing and Literature at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln. Back to top.

Mary Meriam
On Whale Sound: Lone Poem
Mary Meriam is the editor of Lavender Review, an e-zine of lesbian poetry and art, and Filled with Breath: 30 Sonnets by 30 Poets (Exot, 2010), a sonnet anthology. Her poetry chapbook, The Countess of Flatbroke (afterword by Lillian Faderman), was published by Modern Metrics and received an award from the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice. A second chapbook, The Poet’s Zodiac, is forthcoming from Seven Kitchens Press. Poems from The Poet’s Zodiac are currently published in Measure: A Review of Formal Poetry, Two Weeks: A Digital Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Think. Back to top.

Matt Merritt
On Whale Sound: The Quickening (from the collection Troy Town)
Matt Merritt is a poet and journalist from Leicester, UK. His first collection, Troy Town, was published by Arrowhead in 2008, and a new collection, hydrodaktulopsychicharmonica, is out from Nine Arches Press in November 2010. He blogs at Polyolbion. Back to top.

Corey Mesler
On Whale Sound: And Her Name Was I Am Not Staying.
Corey has published in numerous journals and anthologies. He has published four novels, Talk: A Novel in Dialogue (2002), We Are Billion-Year-Old Carbon (2006), The Ballad of the Two Tom Mores (2010) and Following Richard Brautigan (2010), a full length poetry collection, Some Identity Problems (2008), and a book of short stories, Listen: 29 Short Conversations (2009). He has also published a dozen chapbooks of both poetry and prose. He has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize numerous times, and two of his poems have been chosen for Garrison Keillor’s Writer’s Almanac. He also claims to have written, “The Martian Hop.” With his wife, he runs Burke’s Book Store, one of the country’s oldest (1875) and best independent bookstores. Back to top.

Clayton T. Michaels
On Whale Sound: Chokecherry
Clayton T. Michaels is a Pushcart-nominated poet and author of Watermark, which won the 2010 qarrtsiluni chapbook contest and was published by Phoenicia Press in August 2010. He currently teaches composition, creative writing, and comic book-related courses at Indiana University South Bend. You can find him online here. Back to top.

James Midgley
On Whale Sound: Something circled the house while we slept (originally published at Eyewear).
James Midgley’s work has appeared in various journals such as The Kenyon Review, Magma, Poetry Review, The New Welsh Review, The Rialto, Stand, the Warwick Review, etc. In 2008 he received an Eric Gregory Award from the Society of Authors. He is studying towards a PhD at the University of East Anglia in the UK. Back to top.

Amy Miller
On Whale Sound: Rhode Island
“My work has appeared in Many Mountains Moving, Northwest Review, Crab Orchard Review, ZYZZYVA, Tattoo Highway, Convergence, and The Dirty Napkin. I’ve received the Whiskey Island Poetry Prize and the Cloudbank Prize and recently won the Cultural Center of Cape Cod National Poetry Competition, judged by Tony Hoagland. I was raised in Northern California and Western Massachusetts, and now live in Ashland, Oregon, where I work as a trivia-book editor.” Back to top.

Jim Murdoch
On Whale Sound: As Is (originally published at Gloom Cupboard)
Jim Murdoch is a Scottish writer living just outside Glasgow. His poetry has appeared in magazines dating back to the seventies but when the Internet became the in thing he happily moved online and set up home. Although he considers himself primarily a poet he has also written prose works: his third novel, Milligan and Murphy, will appear later this year. He has also recently published his first full collection of poetry, This Is Not About What You Think. Back to top.

Muhammad Muwakil
On Whale Sound: Standing in Line
“I am 26 years old and I am currently enrolled at the University of the West Indies pursuing a degree in Literatures in English with a minor in International Relations. I have been performing spoken word poetry in Trinidad for about the past five years, I am heavily involved in the spoken word poetry movement in Trinidad and by extension the Caribbean region. In 2007, I performed in calabash in Jamaica; in 2009 some of my work was published in the Casa de Las Americas annual review. In 2010, I was a feature presenter at The Nature Island Literary festival in Dominica. I am also an actor and have been involved in several major productions, in 2008 I won the Cacique award (the highest award for acting in Trinidad) best supporting actor, for a role I had a production entitled Bitter Cassava. I am currently in the process of publishing my first collection of poems as well as an album and a performance DVD. I see this work as an essential ingredient in the struggle of the African Diaspora in reconnecting with itself and the continent, it is one of my main goals to use this work to make my people more aware of their past, their present situation and what we need to do to secure our collective future.” Back to top.

Ben Nardolilli
On Whale Sound: Evening Gag (originally published in Puritan Magazine).
“I am a twenty five year old writer currently living in Montclair, New Jersey. My work has appeared in the Houston Literary Review, Perigee Magazine, Canopic Jar, One Ghana One Voice, Baker’s Dozen, Thieves Jargon, Quail Bell Magazine, Elimae, Poems Niederngasse, Gold Dust, Scythe, Anemone Sidecar, The Delmarva Review, Contemporary American Voices, SoMa Literary Review, Gloom Cupboard, Shakespeare’s Monkey Revue, Black Words on White Paper, Cantaraville, and Mad Swirl. I was the poetry editor for West 10th Magazine at NYU and maintain a blog here. Back to top.

Bruce Niedt
On Whale Sound: Taking It All Back (first published in The Barefoot Muse).
Bruce W. Niedt is a career civil servant from southern New Jersey whose poetry has appeared in numerous print and online journals in the US, UK and Australia, including Writers’ Journal, The Lyric, The Barefoot Muse, Mad Poets Review, Journal of New Jersey Poets, Edison Literary Review, US1 Worksheets, Fox Chase Review, The Wolf, and paper wasp. His awards include first prize at the Philadelphia Writers Conference (2006, 2007) and nominations for The Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net Award. His latest chapbook, Breathing Out, is available from Finishing Line Press. Back to top.


Carol Novack
On Whale Sound: Reading of Chokecherry by Clayton T. Michaels and Monkfish originally published in Otholith.
Carol Novack (JD, MSW, but no MFA) is the former recipient of a writer’s award from the Australian government, the author of a poetry chapbook, an erstwhile criminal defense and constitutional lawyer in NYC, and the publisher of the multi-media e-journal Mad Hatters’ Review. She recently moved to Asheville, NC, importing her KGB Bar reading series and founding a non-profit arts organization. Ms. Novack’s writings have been published in numerous journals and anthologies and translated in several languages. Her illustrated collection of fictions, fusions, monologues and poems, Giraffes in Hiding: The Mythical Memoirs of Carol Novack, was published in Fall 2010, by Spuyten Duyvil Press. Hugh Fox has called the book “THE most seductive, original, impacting work I have seen for years. A fascinating combination of Kerouacian street-talk plus a trip through the museum of Modern Art in Chicago, plus a nod-off to Kosty’s furthest out experimentalism. Magnifique!” See Ms. Novack’s blog for further details. Back to top.

Graham Nunn
On Whale Sound: On Seeing My Father Kill A Goat
Graham Nunn is co-founder of Small Change Press and a founding member of Brisbane’s longest running poetry event, SpeedPoets. He blogs fiercely at Another Lost Shark and is the current QLD editor of Blue Dog: Australian Poetry Journal. He has published five collections of poetry, his most recent, Ocean Hearted, published by Another Lost Shark Publications in July 2010. His debut CD, recorded in collaboration with Sheish Money, The Stillest Hour was recently shortlisted for the Overload Poetry Festival’s Aural Text Award. Back to top.

David Oestreich
On Whale Sound: Muse, Incognito
David Oestreich is a human resources professional in northwestern Ohio where he lives with his wife and three children. He edits the online journal Triage. His work has appeared, or is forthcoming, in Minnetonka Review, Umbrella, Ruminate, and Hobble Creek Review. Back to top.

Sherry O’Keefe
On Whale Sound: At Ruby’s Diner (originally published in Fifth Wednesday)’ and This Was Supposed to Be About Karl, But It Didn’t End Up That Way (originally published at PANK).
Sherry O’Keefe, a descendent of Montana pioneers and graduate of MSU-B, is the author of Making Good Use of August (Finishing Line Press). Her most current work has appeared or is forthcoming in Camas, Switched-on Gutenberg, THEMA, Terrain. Org., PANK, Avatar Review, Fifth Wednesday Journal, Prick of the Spindle, The High Desert Journal and Main Street Rag. Currently working on a full collection, Loss of Ignition, she is the poetry editor for Soundzine. She blogs at Too Much August Not Enough Snow. Back to top.

Christina Olson
On Whale Sound: IN WHICH CHRISTINA IMAGINES THAT DIFFERENT TYPES OF ALCOHOL ARE MEN AND SHE IS SEEING THEM ALL
Christina Olson’s first book of poems is Before I Came Home Naked (Spire Press, 2010). Her poetry and nonfiction recently appeared in Wake: Great Lakes Thought and Culture, Passages North, Water~Stone Review, and Anti-. She is currently a visiting assistant professor of writing at Grand Valley State University in Michigan, and lives online here. Back to top.

January Gill O’Neil http://www.facebook.com/january.oneil
On Whale Sound: Drinking (from the collection Underlife, also featured at Verse Daily).
January Gill O’Neil is the author of Underlife (CavanKerry Press, December 2009), and is finishing revisions on her second manuscript. Underlife was a finalist for ForeWord Reviews Book of the Year Award, and the 2010 Paterson Poetry Prize. She was featured in Poets & Writers magazine’s January/February 2010 Inspiration issue as one of its 12 debut poets. She is an advisory board/planning committee member for the 2011 Massachusetts Poetry Festival. A Cave Canem fellow, January is a senior writer/editor at Babson College, runs a popular blog called Poet Mom, and lives with her two children in Beverly, Massachusetts. Back to top.

C.J. Opperthauser
On Whale Sound: Sour (originally published in Snakeskin).
C.J. Opperthauser is a student of English living in Michigan. He has had poems published in Temenos, Eclectic Flash, and elsewhere. He likes to fish. Back to top.

Gabriel Orgrease
On Whale Sound: Tree Reader (originally published at elimae)
Gabriel Orgrease lives and writes on Long Island, USA, state of New York, near the Atlantic Ocean. Back to top.

Hans Ostrom
On Whale Sound: Reading of Shivering Sands by Philip Quinlan
Hans Ostrom is author of The Coast Starlight: Collected Poems 1976-2006 and Honoring Juanita: A Novel (2011). He earned a Ph.D. in English from U.C. Davis and co-wrote Metro: Journeys in Writing Creatively (Longman, 2000). He also co-editor of the Greenwood Encyclopedia of African American Literature (5 volumes). His Youtube channel featuring readings of poetry is called langstonify. Back to top.

Danielle Pafunda
On Whale Sound: The Girls in the Apartment Upstairs (originally published in La Petite Zine).
Danielle Pafunda is author of Iatrogenic: Their Testimonies (Noemi Press 2010), My Zorba (Bloof Books), Pretty Young Thing (Soft Skull Press), and the forthcoming Manhater (Dusie Press Books). She’s an assistant professor of gender & women’s studies and English at the University of Wyoming. Back to top.

Janice Pariat
On Whale Sound: before the word (originally published at Asia Writes)
Janice Pariat is a freelance writer currently based in her hometown Shillong after many years away in Delhi and elsewhere. Her writing is informed by her mixed Portuguese, Khasi and British ancestry, Shillong’s troubled past and her childhood in Assam. Her work has been featured in Art India, The Caravan, India Today, Outlook Traveller, Timeout Delhi as well as a host of online literary/poetry journals. She edits Pyrta, an online journal of poetry, prose, photo essays and sketches. Back to top.

Pamela Johnson Parker
On Whale Sound: First Anniversary: Reading Russian Literature
Pamela Johnson Parker returns to western Kentucky, as do the swallows to Capistrano, from points both west (Denver) and east (Norfolk). She is a certified medical language specialist and adjunct instructor of creative writing/poetry at Murray State University. Her chapbooks are A Walk Through the Memory Palace (Phoenicia Press) and Other Four-Letter Words (Finishing Line Press). Back to top.

Oliver de la Paz
On Whale Sound: Wolf Boy
Oliver de la Paz is the author of Names Above Houses, Furious Lullaby and Requiem for the Orchard. He lives in Washington and blogs here. / Back to top.

Peter Pereira
On Whale Sound: Fugue.
Peter Pereira is a family physician in Seattle, and was a founding editor of Floating Bridge Press. His books include What’s Written on the Body (Copper Canyon 2007), Saying the World (Copper Canyon 2003) and The Lost Twin (Grey Spider, 2000). Back to top.

Allan Peterson
On Whale Sound: Self-knowledge (originally published in Blackbird).
Allan Peterson is a poet and visual artist from Gulf Breeze, FL and Ashland, OR. His Omnivore won Bateau Press’ 2009 Chapbook Prize. His last full length book, All the Lavish in Common, won the 2005 Juniper Prize. He is widely published in print and online and has received fellowships from the NEA and the State of Florida. He recently read his work at the 2010 Cuisle (cush-la) International Poetry Festival in Limerick, Ireland and his next book, As Much As, is forthcoming from Salmon Press, Cliffs of Moher, County Clare. More about Allan here. Back to top.

Jessica Piazza
On Whale Sound: The Astronomer and the Poet (originally published at Spork Press).
A Brooklyn New York native, Jessica Piazza is currently pursuing a PhD in Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Southern California, where she is an editor for the Gold Line Press Chapbook Contest and co-director of the Loudest Voice reading series. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Mid-American Review, National Poetry Review, Agni, 32 Poems, Rattle and Forklift Ohio, among other places. Back to top.


Karsten Piper
On Whale Sound: Reading of Acceptance to her is a phenomenon by Ann Bogle
Karsten Piper lives in southwest Minnesota. He teaches English at Minnesota West Community & Technical College, especially enjoying his developmental and creative writing classes. A few years ago, he took a sabbatical year to study poetry-writing at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. Since then, he has continued to write poems and send them off to be rejected or published by poetry magazines. Karsten blogs at A Poetry Feed, which is also on Facebook. Back to top.


Andrew Philip
On Whale Sound: Pedestrian (from the collection The Ambulance Box).
Andrew Philip was born in Aberdeen in 1975 and grew up near Falkirk. He lived in Berlin for a short spell in the 1990s before studying linguistics at Edinburgh University. He published two poetry pamphlets with HappenStance Press: Tonguefire (2005) and Andrew Philip: A Sampler (2008). The Ambulance Box, his first book of poems, was published by Salt in 2009 and was shortlisted for the Aldeburgh First Collection Prize, the Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust first book award, and the inaugural Seamus Heaney Centre Prize for Poetry. Back to top.

Cati Porter
On Whale Sound: Civil Fruit; Fructify; Fructus Industriales.
Cati is founder and editor-in-chief of Poemeleon: A Journal of Poetry. Her poems have been anthologized in White Ink: Poems on Mothers and Motherhood (Demeter Press), Bedside Guide to No Tell Motel — Second Floor (No Tell Books), and Letters to the World: Poems from the Women’s Poetry Listserv (Red Hen Press). She is the author of a book of poems, Seven Floors Up (Mayapple Press, 2008), as well as several chapbooks: (al)most delicious (Dancing Girl Press, 2010), what Desire makes of us (forthcoming as an illustrated e-book, Ahadada Books) and small fruit songs: prose poems (Pudding House Publications, 2008). Back to top.


Evelyn Posamentier
On Whale Sound: Eleven Brains (originally published in Diagram).
‘Eleven Brains’ is part of Evelyn’s full-length brainiography (2010) which appears online in The Argotist Online’s Ebook Series (2010). She invites you to take a drive in her Royal Blue Car (2011), a second full-length manuscript in The Argotist Ebook Series. Evelyn’s recent work can be found in many places on the internet. She has a particular interest in collaborative and mixed media online work (see Born Magazine, Drunken Boat, 2 River View). Older print publications include work in several anthologies and journals such as The American Poetry Review. Older full-lenth manuscripts placed as finalists in several national competitions. While in school, she won a first-place prize from The Academy of American Poets which paid for new tires for Clarissa, her Dodge Dart. A chapbook of hers resides in Stanford University’s Rare Book Room, as well as in several archives such as The Ransome Center. She recently completed a residency in Poland. Current Events Through Poetry, a recent article about her work, appears in the online version of The Oakland Examiner. Evelyn lives and writes in California. Back to top.

Andrea Potos
On Whale Sound: On Being On the Receiving End of Revenge
My poems appear widely online and in print journals, and am the author of three poetry collections: Abundance to Share With the Birds (Finishing Line Press, 2010), Yaya’s Cloth (Iris Press, 2007), and The Perfect Day (Parallel Press, 1998). Another full-length collection, We Lit the Lamps Ourselves, is forthcoming next year from Salmon Poetry in Ireland. Back to top.

Dawn Potter
On Whale Sound: Touching
Dawn Potter is the author of two collections of poetry–most recently, How the Crimes Happened (CavanKerry Press, 2010). She has also published a memoir, Tracing Paradise: Two Years in Harmony with John Milton (University of Massachusetts Press, 2009), which won the 2010 Maine Literary Award in Nonfiction. New poems and essays appear in the Sewanee Review, the Threepenny Review, Prairie Schooner, and many other journals. Currently Dawn is associate director of the Frost Place Conference on Poetry and Teaching, held each summer at Robert Frost’s home in Franconia, New Hampshire. She lives in Harmony, Maine, with photographer Thomas Birtwistle and their two sons. Back to top.

Nate Pritts
On Whale Sound: (letter from her to me) (originally published in 751 Magazine).
Nate Pritts is the author of four full-length books of poems, most recently Big Bright Sun (BlazeVOX, 2010) and The Wonderfull Yeare (Cooper Dillon Books, 2010). He is the founder & principal editor of H_NGM_N & H_NGM_N BKS. Find him online here. Back to top.

Philip Quinlan
On Whale Sound: Shivering Sands
Philip has two print publications, True North and Leaves and Limnings, and two ebooks, A Game of Graces and Head Lands, all made in collaboration with the artist Annie Ovenden. His work has been accepted by/published in: The Flea, The Chimaera, Lucid Rhythms, Lilt, Soundzine, Numinous, The Avatar Review, The Centrifugal Eye, Sea Stories, Shit Creek Review, Shot Glass Journal, and Victorian Violet Press. He lives in London. Back to top.

Divya Rajan
On Whale Sound: Flaubert’s Babies
Divya Rajan’s work has been published in Poetic Chicago anthology, Apparatus, Read This, Gloom Cupboard, Danse Macabre, The Times of India, Asia Writes, Ultraviolet, and many others. She has been a recipient of a Pushcart Prize nomination in addition to other writing awards, and currently lives in Chicago where she co-edits poetry at The Furnace Review. Her work has also been featured on Wordslingers, Chicago Public Radio and Accents Radio Show. Back to top.

Sam Rasnake
On Whale Sound:Michael Powell’s Women; Chamber Music.
Sam’s poetry has appeared in, OCHO, RICK MAGAZINE, Shampoo, FRiGG, Poets/Artists, Naugatuck River Review, Press 1, Literal Latté, Istanbul Literary Review, Portland Review, Otoliths, MiPOesias, Metazen, and BluePrintReview, as well as the anthologies Best of the Web 2009 (Dzanc Books), Deep River Apartments (The Private Press), and BOXCAR Poetry Review Anthology 2. He is the author of one collection, Necessary Motions (Sow’s Ear Press) and two chapbooks – Religions of the Blood (Pudding House) and Lessons in Morphology (GOSS183). A chapbook of poems, Inside a Broken Clock, is forthcoming from Finishing Line Press. Rasnake also edits Blue Fifth Review, an online journal of poetry and art (Facebook group page). Back to top.

Monica Raymond
On Whale Sound: Economies (originally published at qarrtsiluni).
Monica Raymond is a poet/playwright currently based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. She spent nine of the last ten years attempting to lead a carbon-neutral life in a 19th century New England house, learning how unnecessary is much of what our culture considers the good life. Some of the places she’s taught writing include the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Harvard, and the University of Massachusetts. Her play, THE OWL GIRL, about two families who both have keys to the same house and try to live in it together, won the Clauder Competition Gold Medal, the Peace and Justice prize, and the Castillo Theater’s prize for political theater. You can see more of her work here. Back to top.

Susan Rich
On Whale Sound: The 4 O’Clock News @ House of Sky (originally published in diode).
Susan Rich is the author of three collections of poetry, The Alchemist’s Kitchen (2010), Cures Include Travel (2006), and The Cartographer’s Tongue / Poems of the World (2000) which won the PEN Award for Poetry. She has received awards from the Times Literary Supplement, Peace Corps Writers and the Fulbright Foundation. Her recent poems are published in Harvard Review, TriQuarterly and The Southern Review. She lives in Seattle, WA and blogs at The Alchemist’s Kitchen. Back to top.

Karen Rigby
On Whale Sound: Dear Reader (originally published in Carte Blanche).
Karen Rigby is the author of the chapbooks Savage Machinery (Finishing Line Press, 2008) and Festival Bone (Adastra Press, 2004). Recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, her poems have been published in Best New Poets 2008, Meridian, Black Warrior Review and other journals. She is currently an editor of Cerise Press. Back to top.

Joshua Robbins
On Whale Sound: Theodicy (originally published at Waccamaw).
Joshua Robbins teaches creative writing and serves as editor for Grist: The Journal for Writers at the University of Tennessee, where he is a PhD candidate in English. His awards include the 2008 James Wright Poetry Award, selection for the 2009 Best New Poets anthology, the 2010 New South Prize, and a recent Pushcart Prize nomination. His work appears in Mid-American Review, Third Coast, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Verse Daily, Copper Nickel, 32 Poems, Southern Poetry Review, and elsewhere. He blogs at Little Epic Against Oblivion Back to top.

James Robison
On Whale Sound: The Slender Scent
James Robison has published many stories in The New Yorker, won a Whiting Grant for his short fiction and a Rosenthal Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters for his first novel, The Illustrator, brought out by Bloomsbury in the U.K. His work has appeared in Best American Short Stories, The Pushcart Prize, and Grand Street. He co-wrote the 2008 film, New Orleans Mon Amour. Back to top.

David Rosenthal
On Whale Sound: Braille (originally published at 14 by 14)
“I live in Berkeley, California with my wife and two daughters, and I teach kindergarten and first grade in Oakland. My work has appeared or is forthcoming in several print and online journals. My web credits include The Chimaera, The Flea, Soundzine, Umbrella, The Hypertexts and others. I have been a Pushcart Prize nominee, a Nemerov Sonnet Award nominee, and a semifinalist for both the Richard Wilbur Award and the Donald Justice Prize. More information here. Back to top.

Marybeth Rua-Larsen
On Whale Sound: For The Plain Girls (originally published at Kaleidowhirl).
Marybeth Rua-Larsen lives on the south coast of Massachusetts, half-way between Boston and Cape Cod (but closest to Providence, RI) and teaches ESL and basic skills courses at Bristol Community College. She has recent poems published in The Raintown Review, The Barefoot Muse, Mobius: The Journal of Social Change and The Battered Suitcase. Back to top.

S-Z

Jenny Sadre-Orafai
On Whale Sound: What They Passed Down (originally published in FRiGG).
Jenny Sadre-Orafai’s chapbook, Weed Over Flower, was chosen for publication by Finishing Line Press. Her poetry has appeared in: Wicked Alice, can we have our ball back?, Frigg, Literary Mama, Poetry Midwest, Boxcar Poetry Review, Slant, Caesura, Gargoyle, Ouroboros Review, H_NGM_N, and other fine journals. She currently serves as poetry editor for JMWW and is an Assistant Professor of English at Kennesaw State University. Back to top.

Brynn Saito
On Whale Sound: The Palace of Contemplating Departure (originally published in Drunken Boat)
Brynn Saito is a poet and writer living in San Francisco, CA. Her work has been anthologized in Helen Vendler’s Poems, Poets, Poetry: An Introduction and Anthology, 3rd edition (Bedford/St. Martin’s Press) and From Totems to Hip-Hop: A Multicultural Anthology of Poetry Across the Americas 1900-2002, edited by Ishmael Reed (Thunder Mouth’s Press). Brynn is the recipient of a Kundiman Asian American Poetry Fellowship (2008), the Poets 11 award from the San Francisco Public Library (2010), and the Key West Literary Seminar’s Scotti Merrill Memorial Award (2010). Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in: Pleiades, Harpur Palate, Copper Nickel, Verse Daily, Drunken Boat and The Collagist. Back to top.

Scherezade Siobhan
On Whale Sound: Haqq (A Ghazal for Cairo)
“I am a psychotherapist and a late blooming provocateur!” Back to top.

Michael Schmeltzer
On Whale Sound: Famine is the Name of the Beloved Departed (originally published at Inertia).
Michael Schmeltzer earned an MFA from the Rainier Writing Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University. He helps edit A River & Sound Review and is a two-time nominee of the Pushcart Prize. His work appears or is forthcoming in Natural Bridge, Water~Stone Review, New York Quarterly, Crab Creek Review, and Fourteen Hills, among others. Back to top.

Steven D. Schroeder
On Whale Sound: Haunted By Waters (originally published in diode).
Steven D. Schroeder’s first book of poetry is Torched Verse Ends (BlazeVOX [books]). His poems are available or forthcoming from New England Review, Pleiades, The Journal, Indiana Review, and Verse Daily. He edits the online poetry journal Anti-, serves as a contributing editor for River Styx, and works as a Certified Professional Résumé Writer. Back to top.

Karen Schubert
On Whale Sound: How To Feed the Lover; He Calls Her Etsy.

Karen’s poems appear or are forthcoming in Apple Valley Review, DMQ, Conte, Lunarosity, The Village Pariah and others. Her chapbook The Geography of Lost Houses was published by Pudding House (2008) and Bring Down the Sky was runner-up at Parlor City Press 2010 chapbook contest. A contributing editor for Muse, she teaches writing at Youngstown State University. Back to top.

Peter Schwartz
On Whale Sound: Humanology
Peter Schwartz’s poetry has been featured in The Collagist, The Columbia Review, Diagram, and Opium Magazine. His latest collection Old Men, Girls, and Monsters was released as part of the Achilles Chapbook Series. He’s an interviewer for the PRATE Interview Series, a regular contributor to The Nervous Breakdown, and the art editor for DOGZPLOT. Back to top.

Eric Scovel
Gnoetry
On Whale Sound: I Was Just As The Men In Her (originally published by Beard of Bees Press).
Eric Goddard-Scovel is the author of the chapbook a light heart, its black thoughts (Beard of Bees Press, 2009). Some of his experimental and concrete poetry has recently appeared in The Bleed, Noo Weekly, and Far Out Further Out Out of Sight. More of his work with the computational poetry program Gnoetry 0.2 can be read at Gnoetry Daily under the username eRoGK7. He received an M.F.A. from Purdue University in 2009, and currently lives and teaches in Lafayette, IN. He blogs semi-regularly about his work, life and interests here. Back to top.

Greg Sellers
On Whale Sound: What The Wind Says (originally published in CLR).
Nuclear nomad turned poet, teacher, and now future librarian, Greg Sellers started to write poems at an early age, penning verses for his two brothers to give to their girlfriends. Several Valentine’s Days later his work began appearing in journals, including Poetry, New Letters, Interdisciplinary Humanities, Chronicle of Higher Education, Clackamas Literary Review, and Spiritus: A Journal of Christian Spirituality. The recipient of a Ruth Lilly Poetry Fellowship and a Pushcart Prize nomination, Sellers was awarded a literary artist fellowship by the Mississippi Arts Commission for a manuscript-in-progress entitled Black Magnolia. He currently is completing his final semester in the University of Alabama’s MLIS program and hopes to follow the leads of Jorge Luis Borges, Philip Larkin, Archibald MacLeish, and Stephanie Brown, who all have found librarianship to be conducive to their writing lives. Back to top.

Daniel M. Shapiro
On Whale Sound: Archibald and the convenience-store dispute (originally published at SOFTBLOW)
Daniel M. Shapiro (danshapiro@msn.com) is a schoolteacher who lives in Pittsburgh. His chapbook Trading Fours is forthcoming from Pudding House Press. His poems have appeared online in SOFTBLOW, Lily, The Pedestal, and Shaking Like a Mountain. Collaborations with Jessy Randall can be found online in Shampoo, 42opus, The Dirty Napkin, and EOAGH, and in the forthcoming collection Interruptions (Pecan Grove Press). Back to top.

Laura Sheahen
On Whale Sound: With The Bedouins
Laura Sheahen’s poems have been published in The Dark Horse, Margie, Orbis, The Manhattan Review, Dream Catcher and other magazines. Based in Cambodia, she works for a humanitarian aid agency and travels frequently in Asia and the Middle East. Back to top.

Andrew Shields
On Whale Sound: First Rain in Delhi (originally published at Cortland Review).
Andrew Shields lives with his wife and three children in Basel, Switzerland, where he teaches at the University of Basel. His poems have appeared in many journals, as well as in the chapbook Cabinet d’Amateur (Cologne: Darling Publications, 2005). His latest translation from the German is his contribution to a selection of Durs Grünbein’s essays, The Bars of Atlantis (FSG, 2010.) His lyrics were featured on a CD by Leonti, Everyone/I (Zug, Switzerland: Faze Records, 2009); more of them will appear on Leonti’s next album as well. His own band is Human Shields and he blogs here. Back to top.

Scot Siegel
On Whale Sound: Heaven of the Moment (originally published in Press1; also appearing in the chapbook Skeleton Says [Finishing Line Press 2010]).
Scot Siegel lives in Oregon and works as an urban planning consultant. He is the author of three books of poetry, Skeleton Says, Untitled Country, and Some Weather. His second full-length collection is due out from Salmon Poetry in early 2012. Siegel is a member of the Squaw Valley Community of Writers and serves on the board of trustees of the Friends of William Stafford. He edits the online poetry journal Untitled Country Review. For more information, including links to audio and video clips, reviews, and an author interview, please visit Siegel at Red Room. Back to top.

Brian Simoneau
On Whale Sound: Landscape With Primary Colors (originally published in Breakwater Review).
Brian Simoneau’s poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Boxcar Poetry Review, Breakwater Review, Crab Orchard Review, Natural Bridge, Poet Lore, Poetry East, Red Rock Review, Smartish Pace, and others. He currently lives in Boston with his wife and daughter. Back to top.

Susan Slaviero
On Whale Sound: Coyote
Susan Slaviero‘s first full-length collection of poetry, CYBORGIA, is available from Mayapple Press. Recent work has appeared in Kaliedotrope, Mythic Delirium, Goblin Fruit, Requited and Artifice Magazine. She designs and edits the online lit journal blossombones and is a cast member of The Chicago Brothel. Back to top.

Sarah J. Sloat
On Whale Sound: Vestment; Feng Shui.
Sarah lives in Germany, where she works for a news agency. She is a big fan of Vasko Popa, Elaine Equi and the French surrealists. She also enjoys red wine and stinky cheese and olives, rather like Marlon Brando in The Godfather. Sarah’s poems have appeared in RHINO, Court Green, Bateau and Opium, among other publications. Her chapbook, In the Voice of a Minor Saint, was published in 2009 by Tilt Press. She blogs (soundlessly) at The Rain in My Purse. Back to top.

Erin Elizabeth Smith
On Whale Sound: Singing (originally published at Half Drunk Muse).
Erin Elizabeth Smith is the author of The Fear of Being Found (Three Candles Press 2008) and managing editor of Stirring and the Best of the Net Anthology. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in numerous journals, including 32 Poems, New Delta Review, Yalobusha Review, Water~Stone, Cimarron Review, and RHINO. She currently teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Tennessee. Back to top.

Cheryl Snell
On Whale Sound: Shelter
Cheryl Snell is the author of ten books of fiction and poetry, including two novels. She has published over four hundred poems, stories, and book reviews online and in print. A multiple Best of the Net and Pushcart Prize nominee, her work was selected by Dorianne Laux for a recent Sundress Best of the Net Anthology, and she won the Lopside Press competition for Prisoner’s Dilemma, poetry inspired by art and game theory. When not writing or paying bills, she cooks in the Indian idiom and plays a mean classical piano. Back to top.

Felino Soriano
On Whale Sound: Painters’ Exhalations 22 (originally published at The Recusant).
Felino A. Soriano (b. 1974, California) is a case manager and advocate for adults with developmental and physical disabilities. In 2010, he was chosen for the Gertrude Stein “rose” prize for creativity in poetry from Wilderness House Literary Review. Philosophical studies collocated with his connection to classic and avant-garde jazz explains motivation for poetic occurrences. For information, including his 38 print and electronic collections of poetry, over 2,400 published poems, interviews, and editorships, please visit his website. Back to top.

Marcus Speh
On Whale Sound: The Human Adventure
Read about Marcus here. Back to top.

Sheila Squillante
On Whale Sound: Afternoon Delight (originally published at Red-Headed Stepchild)
Sheila Squillante is a poet and essayist whose work has appeared or is forthcoming in places like Phoebe, TYPO, PANK, Redheaded Stepchild, Brevity, Cream City Review, No Tell Motel, MiPOesias and Literary Mama. She has been the recipient of fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and has received nominations for Best American Essays, Dzanc’s Best of the Web and the Pushcart Prize. She works as the associate director of the MFA program at Penn State. Back to top.


Peter Stephens
On Whale Sound: hollow and Reading of Chokecherry by Clayton T. Michaels
After stints as a trial lawyer and a church worker, Peter Stephens has settled in as a Virginia high school English teacher. He has a few poems published in the anthology Brilliant Coroners and in the online literary magazine qarrtsiluni. He blogs at Slow Reads. Back to top.

Hannah Stephenson
On Whale Sound: One Dress (originally published in Forth Magazine).
Hannah Stephenson is a poet, writer, editor, and instructor. Her poems have appeared in Qarrtsiluni, ouroboros review, The Birmingham Arts Journal, Spoonful, Forth, and Mankind Magazine. You can visit her online at The Storialist, where she posts a new poem every weekday. Back to top.

Paul Stevens
On Whale Sound: The Chart (originally published at the Literary Bohemian).
Paul Stevens was born in Yorkshire, resides in New South Wales, and dreams of living in Catalunya. He has an Honours degree in English from the University if Sydney, and teaches literature and historiography to senior students at an academically selective high school. His particular interests are Renaissance literature and the historiography of Elizabeth I. His poetry and prose is published widely in print and pixel, and he edits The Flea metaphysicalzine. Back to top.

David Allen Sullivan
On Whale Sound: The Day the Beekeeper Died: Sulaymaniyah
“I was first alerted to the power of poetry when my mom—art historian Margaret Sullivan—taught me Ogden Nash’s “Isabel, Isabel, met a bear…” and the line “cruel and cavernous” chilled and thrilled me. My book, Strong-Armed Angels, is available through Hummingbird Press, and my poems, as read by Garrison Keillor, can be heard at The Writer’s Almanac : search for Warnings and Dragonflies at Dawn. I have just completed a multi-voiced manuscript responding to what’s occurring in Iraq and Afghanistan titled: Devil’s Messengers, and one of those poems won first place in the Bloodroot Literary Magazine contest. I teach literature and film at Cabrillo College, in Santa Cruz, CA, where I live with my love, the historian Cherie Barkey, and our two children, Jules, and Amina.” Back to top.

John Swain
On Whale Sound: Binding of Branches (originally published in Journal of Truth and Consequence )
John Swain lives in Louisville, Kentucky. His work has received nominations for the Puschcart Prize, Best of the Net, and Best of the Web. Back to top.


Jennifer K. Sweeney
On Whale Sound: 33 Umbrellas (originally published at DMQ)
Jennifer K. Sweeney’s second poetry collection, How to Live on Bread and Music, received the James Laughlin Award from the Academy of America Poets, the Perugia Press Prize and was later nominated for the Poets’ Prize. Her first book, Salt Memory, won the Main Street Rag Poetry Award. She is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, the Elinor Benedict Poetry Award from Passages North and two Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg awards. Her poems have been translated into Turkish and published widely in literary journals including American Poetry Review and Poetry Daily. She lives in Redlands, CA with her husband, poet Chad Sweeney and their son, Liam. Back to top.

Eileen Tabios
On Whale Sound: Reticent (originally published at POEMFLESH2).
Eileen R. Tabios has released 18 print, four electronic and 1 CD poetry collections, an art essay collection, a poetry essay/interview anthology, and a short story book. Her most recent is The Thorn Rosary: Selected Prose Poems (1998-2010), edited with an introduction by poet-critic-painter-scholar Thomas Fink. Silk Egg, a collection of novels, will be released in 2011. Back to top.

Rob Talbert
On Whale Sound: The Last Scene in Casablanca (originally published in Painted Bride Quarterly).
Rob Talbert enjoys poetry that moves like a fast engine and builds up to great things. His work can be found in recent issues of Alaska Quarterly, Sou’wester, and Inkwell. Currently he is finishing his MFA at Virginia Tech, but Rob is always with you in Rockland. Back to top.

Ken Taylor
On Whale Sound: who’s afraid of james tate? (originally published at elimae)
Ken Taylor lives and writes in North Carolina. His poetry has appeared in The Chattahoochee Review, The Stony Thursday Book, The Fish Anthology, elimae, MiPOesias and is forthcoming in The New Guard. He was a runner up to the 2010 Fish Publishing Poetry Prize. He has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Back to top.

Jeet Thayil
On Whale Sound: The Sonneteer.
Jeet Thayil is a poet, novelist and musician. He is the author of four poetry collections, including These Errors Are Correct and English, and the editor of The Bloodaxe Book of Contemporary Indian Poets. His novel, Narcopolis, is forthcoming. He lives in Bombay. Back to top.

Caitlin Elizabeth Thomson
On Whale Sound: Other Lover’s Letters (originally published at Softblow)
Caitlin Elizabeth Thomson writes about absence, usually in terms of the apocalypse. Her work has appeared in many places and is forthcoming in A cappella Zoo, The Literary Review of Canada, Menacing Hedge, Going Down Swinging, Labletter, and the anthology
Killer Verse. Website here. Back to top.

Matthew Thorburn
On Whale Sound: Every Possible Blue (originally published in diode).
Matthew Thorburn is the author of a book of poems, Subject to Change, and a chapbook, the long poem Disappears in the Rain. Every Possible Blue is the title poem of his recently completed new book manuscript. His website is here. Back to top.

David Tomaloff
On Whale Sound: & (originally published in Calliope Nerve)
[d]avid : [t]omaloff (b. 1972) | racine, WI, US | author, LIONTAMER’S BLUES (six eight press) | his work has also appeared in Ditch, Otoliths, Counterexample Poetics, BlazeVOX 2KX, Deuce Coupe, Straylight Literary Arts Magazine, and is forthcoming in Turntable & Blue Light, Four and Twenty, and and/or | see: liontamersblues.tumblr.com | see: davidtomaloff.com. Back to top.

Emma Trelles
On Whale Sound: For the Woman on the Boulevard (originally published in Poets & Artists).
Emma Trelles is the winner of the 2010 Andres Montoya Poetry Prize, awarded in conjunction with the Institute for Latino Studies. Her collection Tropicalia is forthcoming from the University of Notre Dame Press in 2011. She is also the author of the chapbook Little Spells (GOSS183) and twice nominated for the Pushcart Prize for poetry. She has been a featured author at the Palabra Pura reading series at the Guild Literary Complex in Chicago and at the Miami Book Fair International. Her work has appeared in publications such as Gulf Stream, Verse Daily, 3 AM Magazine, MiPOesias, OCHO, Newsday, the Miami Herald, and the Sun-Sentinel, where she was the art critic for three years. Emma received her MFA from Florida International University and is a regular contributor to the Best American Poetry blog; read her rambles here. Back to top.

Troy Urquhart
On Whale Sound: Where It’s Likely To Go Better (originally published in Hobble Creek Review).
Troy Urquhart is the author of Springtime Sea Bathing (Greying Ghost, 2010), the editor of Willows Wept Review, and a contributor to Vouched Books. He teaches writing and American literature at Montverde Academy, where he serves as Director of Professional Development. Back to top.

Wendy Vardaman
On Whale Sound: Symploce (originally published at Fieralingue)
Wendy Vardaman has a Ph.D. from University of Pennsylvania. Co-editor of Verse Wisconsin and the author of Obstructed View (Fireweed Press, 2009), she works for a children’s theater, The Young Shakespeare Players, in Madison, WI. Wendy & Verse Wisconsin are both on Facebook. Back to top.

Helen Vitoria
On Whale Sound: In My Mother’s Greek Kitchen (originally published in The Scrambler) and The Sights & Sounds of Arctic Birds (originally published at Goldwake Press).
Helen Vitoria lives and writes in Effort PA. Her work can be found and is forthcoming in many journals including: elimae, PANK, Mud Luscious Press, >kill author, Poets & Artists Magazine and Dark Sky Magazine. Her chapbook, The Sights & Sounds of Arctic Birds, is available as an e-chap from Gold Wake Press, 2011. She has been thrice nominated for Best New Poets Anthology 2010. She is completing her first full length collection: Corn Exchange, with an expected release Fall, 2011. Find her here. Back to top.

Donna Vorreyer
On Whale Sound: Of Dark, Of Light (originally published in Boxcar Poetry) and reading of Shivering Sands by Philip Quinlan.
Donna Vorreyer’s poetry has appeared in many journals including ;New York Quarterly, Cider Press Review, Apparatus, Umbrella, qarrtsiluni, and After Hours. Her chapbook Womb/Seed/Fruit is available from Finishing Line Press. She spends her days teaching middle school, trying to convince teenagers that words matter. Back to top.

J. Michael Wahlgren
On Whale Sound: Vow (from the chapbook Credo, also published in Dark Sky Magazine).
J. Michael Wahlgren is author of Valency (Blazevox, 2010) & Silent Actor (Bewrite, 2008) as well as three chapbooks, most recently Credo from Greying Ghost Press. He lives around Boston where he publishes for Gold Wake Press. Back to top.

Terresa Wellborn
On Whale Sound: A Different Leaving
Terresa Wellborn is a fourth generation desert dweller. She is a writer, librarian, and student of life. For the record, she has some degrees (BA, MLIS), a rock garden, and is writing her way to a book. She blogs here. Back to top.

Michael Wells
On Whale Sound: The Cousin (originally published in Right Hand Pointing).
Michael A. Wells is poet, a baseball aficionado, lover of wine and a Diet Coke addict. He makes his home in a Kansas City, Missouri suburb with his wife and pets. His work has appeared in both print and online journals such as Rockhurst Fine Arts Review, Park University Scribe, Boston Literary Magazine, Autumn Sky Poetry and Right Hand Pointing. He is currently working on a poetry manuscript and routinely blogs at Stickpoet Super Hero. Back to top.

Gabriel Welsch
On Whale Sound: What The Deaf Boy Heard
Gabriel Welsch is the author of the collection Dirt and All Its Dense Labor and the chapbook, An Eye Fluent in Gray. He also writes fiction. Recent work appears or is forthcoming in Southern Review, West Branch, PANK, Chautauqua, Right Hand Pointing, 322 Review, Mayday, Panhandler, American Literary Review, and Broadsided. He works as vice president of advancement and marketing at Juniata College, in Huntingdon, PA, where he lives with his wife and two daughters. Back to top.

Sarah Westcott
On Whale Sound: Owls.
Sarah is a journalist who grew up in north Devon and now lives in London working as a news reporter for the ‘Daily Express’. She has a poetry MA from Royal Holloway College, University of London, and her work has been published in various magazines and anthologies. Back to top.

Johnathon Williams
On Whale Sound: Leveling Up (originally appeared at The Morning News)
Johnathon Williams is a writer, editor, and web developer living in Fayetteville, Arkansas. His poems have appeared in The Morning News, Unsplendid, 42 Opus, and various print magazines that can’t be linked to. An essay he wrote about his personal relationship with zombie movies is required reading in university writing programs across the county. (Not really). Back to top.

Susan Settlemyre Williams
On Whale Sound: Hatshepsut Orders Her Portrait as a Lion-Headed Sphinx (originally published in diode).
Susan Settlemyre Williams is the author of Ashes in Midair, which was selected by Yusef Komunyakaa as the winner of the Many Mountains Moving Poetry Book Contest (Many Mountains Moving Press, 2008) and a chapbook, Possession (Finishing Line Press, 2007). Her poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Prairie Schooner, Mississippi Review, diode, and Shenandoah, among other journals, and in various anthologies, including Best New Poets 2006. She is book review editor and associate literary editor of the online journal Blackbird and lives in Richmond, Virginia. Back to top.

Robert Wood
On Whale Sound: Blue Mexico (originally published in Blue Fifth Review).
Robert E. Wood teaches in the School of Literature, Communication, and Culture at Georgia Tech. His film studies include essays on Fosse, DePalma, and Verhoeven, as well as The Rocky Horror Picture Show. He is the author of Some Necessary Questions of the Play, a study of Hamlet. His poetry has appeared online in Blue Fifth Review, Ouroboros, Poets and Artists, Rose and Thorn Journal, Sliver of Stone Magazine, Chickenpinata, and Cha: An Asian Literary Journal. His chapbook, Gorizia Notebook, was published by Finishing Line Press. Back to top.

Nicholas Wong
On Whale Sound: Self Portrait (originally published in Prime Number).
Nicholas YB Wong is the author of Cities of Sameness (Desperanto, forthcoming) and the winner of several awards, including the Sentinel Quarterly Poetry Competition, nominations for the Best of the Net and Web Anthologies in 2010. He is currently a poetry editor for THIS Literary Magazine and a poetry reader for Drunken Boat. Back to top.

Bill Yarrow
On Whale Sound: Bone Density (originally published in PIF Magazine)
Bill Yarrow is the author of WRENCH (erbacce-press, 2009) and “Wound Jewelry” (new aesthetic, 2010). His poems have recently appeared in BLIP, PANK, Poetry International, DIAGRAM, Ramshackle Review, LITSNACK, Blue Fifth Review, this, Used Furniture Review, and Everyday Genius. He lives in Illinois. Back to top.

Debbie Yee
On Whale Sound: Cinderella’s Last Will & Testament (originally published at MiPOesias).
Debbie Yee is a lawyer-poet and community organizer for the nonprofit literary and arts community. Her poems have appeared in The Best American Poetry 2009, 32 Poems, OCHO and Fence. She is a Kundiman fellow, Intergenerational Writers Lab alumna and graduate of U.C. Berkeley and U.C. Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall). Debbie lives in San Francisco where she is in-house legal counsel for one of the national banks and periodically teaches writing and printmaking classes. Back to top.

Susan Yount
On Whale Sound: Closer (originally published at qarrtsiluni) http://qarrtsiluni.com
Susan Yount is madam of the Chicago Poetry Brothel and editor and publisher of the Arsenic Lobster Poetry Journal. Her poetry chapbook, House on Fire, is forthcoming from Tilt Press. She received top honors in the Poetry Center of Chicago’s 2010 Juried Reading and works full time at the Associated Press. She is currently an MFA student in poetry at Columbia College Chicago and mother to the cutest little boy! Back to top.

Andrew Zawacki
On Whale Sound: Credo (originally published in Boston Review).
Andrew Zawacki is the author of the poetry books Petals of Zero Petals of One (Talisman House), Anabranch (Wesleyan), and By Reason of Breakings (Georgia). Recent chapbooks include Lumièrethèque (Blue Hour), Glassscape (Projective Industries), Roche limit (tir aux pigeons), and Bartleby’s Waste-book (PS). He is coeditor of Verse, and his translation of Sébastien Smirou, My Lorenzo, is forthcoming from Burning Deck. Back to top.

J. Zimmerman
On Whale Sound: Bearers of Gifts (originally published at Ariadne’s Web).
Free-lance writer J. Zimmerman is co-editor and contributor for Poetry at Ariadne’s Web. Her poems are published internationally and have won the Mary Lonnberg Smith Poetry Prize. She has worked as a solid-state physicist, radio host, falconry apprentice, software designer, university tutor, and a surveyor at archaeological sites in Britain and Greece. Back to top.

Desmond Kon Zhicheng-Mingdé
On Whale Sound: Vignette 016 (originally published at Psychic Meat Loaf)
Desmond Kon Zhicheng-Mingdé has recent or forthcoming work in Barnstorm, Floorboard Review, Four and Twenty, FuseLit, Intersections, REM Magazine, Straylight, and The Oral Tradition. Trained in publishing at Stanford, with a theology masters from Harvard and fine arts masters from Notre Dame, he has edited more than 10 books and co-produced 3 audio books, several pro bono for non-profit organizations. Desmond also works in clay, his commemorative pieces housed in museums and private collections in India, the Netherlands, the UK and the US. These can be viewed at Saatchi Online. Back to top.

  1. […] Dick Jones, Kate Fitzpatrick and I tackle The Slender Scent by James Robison, sent in to Whale Sound as an audio submission by Kate. […]

  2. […] about Kristin Berkey-Abbott poem text download audio 1 min 14 secs […]

  3. […] about Nick Demske poem text download audio 1 min 39 secs […]

  4. […] about M.E. Hope poem text download audio 1 min 19 secs […]

  5. We are a group of volunteers and starting a new scheme in our community.Your web site provided us with valuable info to work on.You’ve done a formidable job and our entire community will be thankful to you

  6. […] Whale Sound started up a year and one month ago in August 2010 – Published readings of poems by 212 poets – Published 7 audio chapbooks in multiple formats – website, e-book, PDF and print – […]

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